The Israel Deception

Is the return of Israel in the 20th century truly a work of God, or is it a result of a cosmic chess move to deceive the elect by the adversary?

Showing posts with label property. Show all posts
Showing posts with label property. Show all posts

Sunday, April 23, 2017

International law firm seeks to define Bitcoin as property rather than as a currency

A month ago, an international law firm that specializes in blockchain technologies and crypto-currencies submitted a white paper in which they advocated that Bitcoin should be officially recognized as property and protected by the property laws of sovereign countries.

Using a California legal precedent on property as their foundation for U.S. determination, the firm believes Bitcoin transactions should be conducted the same as one would do with property, where contractual agreements between two parties utilize permissions and escrow while allowing the Bitcoin owner to retain ownership until the terms of the contract are complete.

Image result for bitcoin is property

Image use courtesy of Michael Carney/pondodaily
As Bitcoin is adopted by more users every day, the need to determine how it can integrate into mainstream society becomes even more pressing. One major question continues to be how traditional laws apply to Bitcoin and its use. 
Many of those determinations could have major implications for Bitcoin and its holders, and few will play a bigger role in the United States than property laws, which could ultimately govern ownership over the digital currency. 
A new white paper, “Treatment of Bitcoin Under U.S. Property Law,” seeks to analyze how the worlds of digital currency and property law should intersect. The report was assembled by Perkins Coie, an international law firm that specializes in blockchain technology and digital currency and has been active in the space since 2013. While detailed and clearly well-researched, the paper’s foremost conclusion is straightforward and transparent. 
“We conclude that property interests should exist in bitcoin under such law, and that multiple sources of persuasive authority provide additional support for that conclusion,” the paper’s authors, J. Dax Hansen and Joshua L. Boehm, wrote. 
The paper begins with an overview of Bitcoin’s technological attributes and what those mean for how property law can apply to it. Using California state law as a benchmark and Bitcoin transactions as an example, the authors make their case. 
“Parties may ... enter into contractual arrangements in which one party entrusts partial or complete control of such private key(s) to a third party while still maintaining formal title to the bitcoin value represented in applicable [unspent transaction outputs],” the paper reads. “These kinds of contractual arrangements are commonplace in custodial, trust, and escrow settings, which have generated well-developed legal principles that should generally translate to bitcoin custodial contexts.” 
The paper dissects academic articles from some of the country’s foremost law professors, who also, for the most part, support the idea that intangible property rights should apply to Bitcoin: 
“Property law scholars who have encountered the bitcoin ownership issues in the context of broader, more theoretical undertakings have reached (or assumed) the same general conclusion ... that is, interests in bitcoin should be protected by property law.” - Bitcoin Magazine
Perhaps the most important question in this concept of labeling Bitcoin and other crypto-currencies as property in the eyes of the legal system is that it would have a profound effect on Bitcoin exchanges who have in the past simply mixed all customer accounts and currencies into a 'pool' rather than keeping them segregated and untouchable without the permission of the account holder.  In fact, it was this re-hypothication scheme that led to the insolvenciea of exchanges like MT. Gox, who used financial and security regulations rather than property law to end up selling more Bitcoins to customers than they had available in their own account.

The United States court system has already made initial rulings that label Bitcoin as property, mostly for taxation purposes rather than for legal protections.  But until the world comes to a consensus on what exactly Bitcoin and other crypto-currencies function as... property, securities, currency, etc... then for the most part crypto-currencies will remain on the fringe and in the realm of a select few who recognize their potential and application.

Friday, April 7, 2017

As we get closer to tax day in the U.S., the IRS is paying close attention to Bitcoin traders paying their due

Tax day in the U.S. this year is April 18, and ironically it is on a Tuesday rather than Monday because of the recognition of 'Emancipation Day' on the 17th.  However this emancipation is tied to Lincoln's proclamation freeing the slaves back in 1863 rather than every American's emancipation from having to pay income tax or the myriad of other onerous government obligations.

Which brings us to the newest tax that must be paid by individuals who have conducted either commerce, or trade in the crypto-currency known as Bitcoin.  In a ruling by a Federal district court back in 2014, Bitcoin was deemed to be a security rather than money, and as such is to be taxed the same way one does with property.  Ie... if you made a profit from the difference when you bought and sold Bitcoin, you are required to pay taxes on those profits, and record it in your tax return.

Image result for taxes on bitcoin

Image use courtesy of Michael Carney/pondodaily
When you file your taxes this year, your accountant might ask if you own any bitcoin.
The popular digital currency recently hit an all-time high of $1,327 per coin, and while there arguably still hasn’t been a “killer app” (a mainstream purpose for a layperson to use bitcoin), its main use right now is as a speculative investment—and it has been a good investment. 
And if you’ve bought something using bitcoin, or sold something for bitcoin, or traded bitcoin for fiat currency, you should consider making that clear on your taxes.
Believe it or not, the IRS posted official language on digital currency back in 2014; it considers bitcoin to be property. “For federal tax purposes,” the IRS says in no uncertain terms, “virtual currency is treated as property. General tax principles applicable to property transactions apply to transactions using virtual currency.” 
If you’ve bought bitcoin simply to hold it as a speculative investment, you don’t need to disclose anything. But as with stocks, income from the sale of bitcoin would be taxed as capital gains, based on the value of bitcoin at the time you sold it. The same goes for if you receive bitcoin as payment, the IRS says: “A taxpayer who receives virtual currency as payment for goods or services must, in computing gross income, include the fair market value of the virtual currency, measured in US dollars.” - Yahoo Finance
It is this recognition of Bitcoin as a security rather than as money that will make it more difficult to use Bitcoin in its original intention as a medium of exchange for goods and services.  Because in every single transaction you make, whether through the paying with or in the receiving of the crypto-currency, you have to keep a record of every transaction, and at the current market value of Bitcoin in U.S. dollars at the time of the transaction.

The IRS has stated recently that they are now planning to single out individuals who buy, sell, or use Bitcoin, and look closely to see if they are or have been recording their use of the crypto-currency on their tax returns.  And unfortunately this scrutiny will cause many who were considering buying some Bitcoin for commercial or investment purposes to think again as the government makes it nearly more trouble than its worth.

Friday, December 18, 2015

Thomas Jefferson was right again as Germany takes over Greek infrastructure because of debt

Founding Father Thomas Jefferson once said, “If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their currency, first by inflation, then by deflation, the banks and corporations that will grow up around them will deprive the people of all property until their children wake up homeless on the continent their Fathers conquered.”  And in a sad but interesting 21st century version of this prediction over in Europe, Germany has used Greece’s odious debt to take over several Greek airports.
Most of Greece’s nearly $300 billion in debts owed to the ECB, IMF, and foreign sovereign banks like Germany came from defaulted bonds that were originally purchased by private institutions, who then used the central bank to force Greece to cover the debt by borrowing from them.  And since the Credit Crisis and Great Recession made it impossible for Greece to even remotely pay off these loans, the end result is now Greece having to sell the rights to their own infrastructure, and to the very debtors who refused to negotiate a settlement earlier this year.

Read more on this article here...

Friday, November 6, 2015

Millennials trust more in gold than in stocks in new survey

Every quarter, CNBC does a special report that they call the All-American Economic Survey.  And in their newest one on Nov. 3, investing trends for millennials showed an immense opposition to stocks and more trust in both real estate and gold.
Part of this appears to be the fact that many millennials have grown up in the decades of the dot com bust and the 2008 credit crisis which saw their parents and grandparents lose upwards of 40% of their retirement portfolios tied to the stock markets.  And with the millennial generation known for truth and straight talk over political correctness and subterfuge, perhaps it is not surprising that the younger generation has a much greater distrust in banks and Wall Street, and has little appetite for riskier investments, especially since the markets are manipulated so highly by the Fed and by HFT computer trading.

Read more on this article here...

Friday, July 10, 2015

New Mexico cops cry that they will lose free money with new anti-civil forfeiture law

The rise in civil forfeiture’s, or the confiscating (stealing) of private money simply because law enforcement believes a person is guilty without proof,  and where any cash and property in their possession is assumed to have been used illegally despite no crime ever being committed, has been a boon to the coffers and budgets of police agencies all across the country.  But with public revelations of this un-Constitutional act leading some cities and states to pass laws ending this practice, some law enforcement agencies in New Mexico are crying unfair.


Read more on this article here...

Tuesday, July 7, 2015

New Mexico cops cry that they will lose free money with new anti-civil forfeiture law

The rise in civil forfeiture’s, or the confiscating (stealing) of private money simply because law enforcement believes a person is guilty without proof,  and where any cash and property in their possession is assumed to have been used illegally despite no crime ever being committed, has been a boon to the coffers and budgets of police agencies all across the country.  But with public revelations of this un-Constitutional act leading some cities and states to pass laws ending this practice, some law enforcement agencies in New Mexico are crying unfair.


Read more on this article here...