The Israel Deception

Is the return of Israel in the 20th century truly a work of God, or is it a result of a cosmic chess move to deceive the elect by the adversary?

Showing posts with label thanksgiving. Show all posts
Showing posts with label thanksgiving. Show all posts

Thursday, November 24, 2016

Dollar strength leads to more purchasing power as Thanksgiving dinner costs for 2017 go down

It's Thanksgiving once again and that time of the year again where many things kick into motion for the American consumer.

Beginning with gasoline prices climbing a bit for areas around the country that switch over to winter blends, the season culminates with the arrival of snowbirds down South from Canada and the Northern U.S. locations and of course, the home stretch for retailers during the Christmas holiday shopping season.

But the main course for this period is as always Thanksgiving, and the coming together of families along with the cooking and baking of the traditional dinner.

Each year economists try to put together a cost analysis for the average dinner and more often than not, the price rises around 3-5% from the year before.  But with the dollar suddenly strengthening to levels not seen in the past 13 years, that additional purchasing power has done something not seen in quite some time...

A decline in cost for this year's Thanksgiving meal.

According to the American Farm Bureau Federation's (AFBF) annual informal price survey, the average meal for 10 people will be $49.87--  a 24-cent drop from last year’s average of $50.11. 
The survey’s shopping list includes enough turkey, bread stuffing, sweet potatoes, rolls (with butter, of course), peas, cranberries, a vegetable tray, pumpkin pie with whipped cream, coffee and milk for 10 eaters. The AFBF has been commissioning this study for 31 years. 
Foods showing the largest reductions this year were pumpkin pie mix, milk and a veggie tray comprised of celery and carrots. A 30-ounce can of pumpkin pie mix was $3.13, a gallon of milk was $3.17 and a one-pound veggie tray of celery and carrots was just 73-cents. 
A group of miscellaneous items including coffee and ingredients need to prepare the meal (butter, evaporated milk, onions, eggs, sugar and flour) came in at $2.81. 
The headliner - a 16-pound turkey - averaged a total of $22.74 (about $1.42 per pound). That’s a decrease of 2 cents per pound, or an overall 30 cents per whole turkey, compared to last year. - Fox News

Thursday, November 26, 2015

100 years ago, Thanksgiving dinner cost 1/100th of the cost it does now... thank you inflation and the Federal Reserve

Prior to the advent of the Federal Reserve and the creation of of a central bank to control monetary policy, Thanksgiving dinner at a nice restaurant cost individuals about .50 in 1909.  But fast forward a little more than 100 years and that cost for the same foods cooked at home versus dining out, are more than 100 times the cost.

Why?  Inflation, and in particular, inflation created by a central bank who has expanded the money supply far beyond the value of what food cost to produce.



And a Thanksgiving night out at the Hotel Gettysburgh, 1909.


And of course, the value of a dollar one hundred years later thanks to our corrupt banker friends at the Federal Reserve.


Happy Thanksgiving!  I hope that all who read this can still afford it.

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

Travelers choosing to drive more this Thanksgiving than fly due to TSA intrusions

A new report from the airline industry shows that holiday flying this Thanksgiving is expected to be down 2% from last year.  In the meantime, driving is expected to be up 4% over the same time period, and citizens name one primary culprit as the reason for the changes.

TSA intrusions.

The Air Transport Association expects 2 percent fewer people will fly this Thanksgiving week compared with last year, while AAA projects a 4 percent increase in automobile travel.
Still, some travelers are bothered by a screening process that has become increasingly time-consuming and intimate, and industry representatives say they are worried that these frustrations are contributing to a decline in air travel.
Last week, the U.S. Travel Association released a market research study showing that while most travelers who have flown at least once in the past year are satisfied with the T.S.A.’s overall performance, frequent fliers have more complaints.
When asked to list their top frustrations with air travel, travelers chose these issues related to security: “the wait time to clear the T.S.A. checkpoint,” “having to remove shoes, belts and jackets at the T.S.A. checkpoint” and “T.S.A. employees who are not friendly.” - NY Times

Years after 9/11, and the introduction of current TSA practices, many Americans still find it more 'friendly' to drive a few extra miles to their Thanksgiving celebrations that to go through the hassle of the 'not so friendly' skies.