The Israel Deception

Is the return of Israel in the 20th century truly a work of God, or is it a result of a cosmic chess move to deceive the elect by the adversary?

Showing posts with label shortfall. Show all posts
Showing posts with label shortfall. Show all posts

Thursday, March 31, 2016

Ratings agency downgrades Chicago as years of bad fiscal policies with pensions comes home to roost

One of the biggest problems with the majority of politicians coming from the lawyer class is that they have little idea about fiscal responsibility and economics, or any understanding of the consequences that come from promising the world to voters in order to get re-elected.  In fact, Washington is not only known for trying to buy votes from constituents with ever increasing benefit programs, but they are the also the poster child of robbing Peter to pay Paul when it comes to things like stealing from the Social Security Trust to pay for new programs.
Municipalities are not immune to this paradigm as well, with many liberalized cities having chosen the path of egregious fiscal policies which are now coming home to roost as their budgets run deficits that place them on the cusp of insolvency.  And perhaps the biggest culprit in this is the City of Chicago, who after years of making pension promises they couldn’t hope to keep are on the verge of being downgraded to junk status and out of options when it comes to paying out benefits to retirees.
state pensions
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Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Pension shortfalls force states to put retirees money at risk

If there is one thing most politicians fail at, it is their ability to project and plan for the future, when it often more beneficial to their careers to sell out for today.  And because politicians for the most part are tied to 2-4 year election cycles, it rarely behooves them to make policies that are beneficial to constituents over the long run, and instead are more apt to sacrifice the future for their political present.

Because of the inflated housing bubble of the mid 2000′s, states were saturated with tax revenues and budget surpluses.  Yet instead of trusting history that validates that all economic cycles go both up and down, they spent this money like drunken sailors and even mortgaged their budgetary future through debt and the belief that the good times would never go away.  Because of this, state pension funds, which were primarily driven by municipal bonds and equity stocks, cratered hard during the Great Recession that began in 2009.  And five years later, these retirement funds have not yet recovered in nearly all regions within the United States.


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