The Israel Deception

Is the return of Israel in the 20th century truly a work of God, or is it a result of a cosmic chess move to deceive the elect by the adversary?

Showing posts with label sec. Show all posts
Showing posts with label sec. Show all posts

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Move over Bitcoin as SEC may choose to allow Ethereum ETF instead

With the SEC announcing yesterday that it was reopening the case for the Winklevoss twins Bitcoin ETF, another crypto-currency is also vying for the same market regulators approval.

And this one might have a better chance of success than the Father of All digital currencies.

Ethereum is a crypto-currency that has the backing of many large S&P 500 companies, and this provides it a much better foundation for approval as an exchange traded fund according to the SEC.

Image result for ethereum
Then today, in similarly favorable news for holders of Bitcoin's smaller peer, Ethereum, it was revealed that the SEC had quietly begun the process of considering whether to approve an exchange-traded fund for the cryptocurrency ethereum. Recall that ethereum exploded higher at the end of February when it was revealed that a consortium of venerable corporations including JPM, Intel, Microsoft and many others, had created a blockchain alliance based on the ether technology. 
In same ways, whereas bitcoin has been seen as the more venerable, if "renegade" cryptocurrency, ether has developed the reputation of the smaller, better-behaved relative, one which is backed by major banks and corporations, which in the past has distanced itself from bitcoin due to limitations associated with its specific blockchain technology. 
While ether and bitcoin are similar, they are also very different. First of all, none of the big Chinese exchanges lists ether for trading (which means it is only a matter of time before they do) sending it into orbit as the traditional Chinese bubble stampede does. Second, the two biggest ether exchanges are Coinbase and Kraken, both regulated.
Ethereum is backed by almost all household brands who have formed an alliance in support of the platform. Microsoft is a big proponent, with ether’s protocol added to Hyperledger, the open-source cross-industry blockchain development effort headed by the Linux Foundation. 
Whether that makes an ether-based ETF more likely remains to be seen. What we do know is that the backers of the EtherIndex Ether Trust first filed in July 2016, seeking to launch an ETF backed by a cache of ethers on the NYSE Arca exchange, according to Coindesk. NYSE Arca then filed for a proposed rule change clearing the way for the ETF listing in December, according to a notice published in January
Then, in a new notice from the SEC, the agency announced that it has begun considering whether to approve the proposed ETF, opening up a comment period for outsiders. - Zerohedge

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

SEC shoots down second financial product to try to put Bitcoin on Wall Street

On March 29 the SEC rejected the second Exchange Traded Product (ETP) in the past 30 days to try to take Bitcoin to Wall Street and financialize the crypto-currency.

Citing the primary fact that Bitcoin is an unregulated currency as the reason for the rejection, in the end for Bitcoin purists the last thing they want is for the currency to become blemished through financialization and being destroyed by derivative trading.

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Tuesday denied for the second time this month a request to bring to market a first-of-its-kind product tracking bitcoin, the digital currency. 
The SEC announced in a filing its decision denying Intercontinental Exchange Inc's NYSE Arca exchange the ability to list and trade the SolidX Bitcoin Trust, an exchange-traded product (ETP) that would trade like a stock and track the digital asset's price. 
Previously, the regulatory agency said it had concerns with a similar proposal by investors Cameron Winklevoss and Tyler Winklevoss. 
"The Commission believes that the significant markets for bitcoin are unregulated," the SEC said in its filing, echoing language from its decision earlier this month on the application by CBOE's Bats exchange to list The Bitcoin ETF proposed by the Winklevoss brothers. On Friday, Bats asked the SEC to review its decision not to allow that fund to trade. - CNBC

Friday, March 10, 2017

Bitcoin price flash crashes as SEC rejects application for a Bitcoin ETF

In a move that should have seen holders of Bitcoin rejoice rather than panic, the SEC on March 10 rejected the Winklevoss twins application to create a Bitcoin ETF, which would have seriously harmed the crypto-currency by financializing it under Wall Street control.

Yet because Bitcoin has become the primary crypto-currency of choice, easily winning out over other digital forms such as Etherium, Dash, and Monero, its volatility is extraordinary since it has already become partially financialized via Bitcoin exchanges.

And thus when the news broke we saw the price in USD fall nearly $300 down to $978.


After much anticipation (and a spike to record highs earlier today), The SEC has decided to reject the Winklevoss application for a Bitcoin ETF. 
The SEC premise appears to be the unregulated natuire of the underlying: 
Based on the record before it, the Commission believes that the significant markets for bitcoin are unregulated. 
Therefore, as the Exchange has not entered into, and would currently be unable to enter into, the type of surveillance-sharing agreement that has been in place with respect to all previously approved commodity-trust ETPs—agreements that help address concerns about the potential for fraudulent or manipulative acts and practices in this market - the Commission does not find the proposed rule change to be consistent with the Exchange Act. - Zerohedge
The irony is that Bitcoin should have gone higher rather than flash crash because supporters of the crypto-currency desperately want to keep it out of the hands of Wall Street, banks, and government regulators.  However, when we look at how activities taken by the Chinese government last month could cause the same type of volatility to the price of Bitcoin as today's ruling did, the question needs to be asked if the digital money has not already been corrupted to the point in centralization that it no longer provides the wealth protection and security that were the platforms that made Bitcoin unique.

Friday, October 14, 2016

Got gold? Today the new SEC rule goes into effect allowing the government to move your non-invested cash into Treasuries

Back in 2014 the SEC passed a rule that now goes into effect on Oct. 14 where investors and pension funds who do not have their money in a security can summarily have their cash reserves moved into U.S. Treasuries rather than money market funds.

While designating this mechanism to only be used during extreme 'adverse conditions', the fact that the global financial and banking systems are teetering on another 'Lehman Moment' means that the government could co-opt your money at any time, and is a backdoor way into moving your retirement and pension assets into Treasury debt instruments to help fund the government.

Image result for government wants your retirement and pensions
The big day has finally arrived: starting today, as previewed repeatedly over the summer, the SEC's 2a-7 money fund reform adopted in 2014 officially require many prime money market mutual funds (those that invest in non-government issued assets such as short-term corporate and municipal debt) to float their net asset value. More importantly, these prime MMFs are allowed to delay client withdrawals under adverse market conditions. 
The rule aim to prevent the sort of chaos that hit the money market after Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc.’s 2008 bankruptcy, which helped spark the financial crisis. The goal is to give investors a way to monitor a fund’s health by tracking its fluctuating net asset value, and to contain the fallout that could be caused by many investors cashing out at once, the SEC wrote in the final rules. 
As as result, many Prime MMFs are and have been converting their assets to government funds, not buying CDs anymore and moving into Treasurys and agencies. As the chart below shows, nearly $1 trillion in assets have rotated out of prime money markets into government funds, as a result sending Libor rates through the roof, to the highest level since the financial crisis, with consequences that have yet to be determined. - Zerohedge
But this scheme gets even more diabolical as the new SEC rules also allow for the government to DELAY in giving you or your broker the cash funds moved into Treasuries, thus making it so you no longer have control over your own money.
Take the case of Simon Gore, treasurer of budget carrier Spirit Airlines, who has had a relatively simple job over the past several years when he took tens of millions of dollars of company cash and parked it in money-market funds. Gore told the WSJ he has moved money out of some funds and is considering his options for depositing the more than $1 billion of cash and investments on Spirit’s balance sheet. 
Gore had previously put almost all of Spirit’s cash in prime money-market funds. Now, he has shifted most of it to money funds that invest in debt issued by the federal government or agencies such as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, which aren’t affected by the new rules. He said the prospect of a floating net asset value - which also means client withdrawals can be delayed - caused him to think twice about prime funds. Besides facing the risk of losing money under the new rules, companies would have to record changes in the value of their cash, creating accounting headaches.
Ever since the 2008 financial crisis the government has been seeking ways to co-opt the nearly $17 trillion in individual retirement, pension, and mutual fund monies, and this, like Barack Obama's MyRA scheme, is just another backdoor way for them to do so.

How much longer can you trust your future to Wall Street or elected officials who have proven themselves to be some of the most fiscally irresponsible entities in history?

Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Former head of the SEC comes clean and admits market is rigged

Although absolution is indeed good for the soul, it does little to help those who were pillaged while fraud and corruption took place under a director’s watch.  And while new revelations by former SEC chief John Ramsay on March 10 validate that the market is a rigged game and programmed to benefit insiders over all other investors, it does little to alleviate the carnage that has helped create the worst wealth disparity in the history of American capitalism.


Read more on this article here...

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Former member of Plunge Protection Team confirms government controls all markets

For years many economists and investors believed that the government played a much bigger role in controlling markets than the mainstream let on.  And when you look at how regulatory bodies such as the CFTC and SEC failed to halt illegal activity by banks and corporations in areas such as insider trading, naked short selling, and commodity manipulation, the evidence of this becomes much too strong to ignore.
But for the first time in the decades of this ‘conspiracy theory’ belief, the oppressed finally have a whistle blower, and one who actually worked on the government’s Plunge Protection Team.  And like Edward Snowden’s revelations of government spying occurring over every aspect of our lives, so too does former U.S. financial adviser Dr. Pippa Malmgren publicly affirm that not only does the government manipulate the markets as they see fit, they control every aspect of them.
 
Read more on this article here...
 

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Back to back: Former attorney for SEC and Deutsche Bank dead of ‘suicide’

For bankers and other members of the banking industry, when it comes to the plethora of mysterious deaths and suicides taking place for these individuals, 2014 is the year of the macabre.  And just one day after a French-Israeli hedge fund manager with ties to Total’s Christophe de Margarie was found dead of an apparent suicide, another former insider is being reported dead in what investigators are citing as suicide by hanging.


Read more on this article here...

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Federal government pays whistleblowers but only if they benefit Uncle Sam

Under the Obama administration, whistle blowers in agencies such as the NSA, CIA, or DOD have not only been vilified, but in some cases, threatened with criminal indictment for making public illegal activities being done within agencies of the U.S. government.  However, not all whistle blowing is being met with punishment as the SEC on Sept. 22 proved that if you rat out someone for Uncle Sam, rather than against him, you will be rewarded for your efforts.
 
Rewarded in some cases to the tune of $30 million dollars.
 
 
Read more on this article here...

Friday, December 16, 2011

Three years too late: Sec to finally sue Fannie and Freddie executives for fraud

During the Savings and Loan scandal of two plus decades ago, over 1100 bankers were arrested, indicted, and jailed for fraud.  In the 2008 credit crisis and subprime meltdown, nary a soul has been interrogated beyond a cursory hearing before the Congressional dog and pony shows.

So when the SEC in 2011 finally decides to step up and act like they are doing their fudiciary and regulatory duty in suing former CEO's of Fannie and Freddie for fraud and misleading investors on the subprime risk, it is simply a matter of three years too late, and one wonders if this is a simply a political move, rather than a judicial one.

Between December 6, 2006, and August 8, 2008, (the "Relevant Period"), Daniel H. Mudd ("Mudd"), Enrico Dallavecchia ("Dallavecchia") and Thomas A. Lund ("Lund") (collectively, "Defendants"), made or substantially assisted others in making materially false and misleading statements regarding Fannie Mae's exposure to subprime and Alt-A loans.
For example, in a February 2007 public filing, Fannie Mae described subprime loans as loans "made to borrowers with weaker credit histories" and reported that 0.2%, or approximately $4.8 billion, of its Single Family credit book of business as of December 31, 2006, consisted of subprime mortgage loans or structured Fannie Mae Mortgage Backed Securities ("MBS") backed by subprime mortgage loans.
Fannie Mae did not disclose to investors that in calculating the Company's reported exposure to subprime loans, Fannie Mae did not include loan products specifically targeted by the Company towards borrowers with weaker credit histories, including Expanded Approval ("EA") loans. As ofDecember 31, 2006, the amount ofEA loans owned or securitized in the Company's single-family credit business was approximately $43.3 billion, yet none of these loans were included in the Company's disclosed subprime exposure. - Lawsuit filed

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