The Israel Deception

Is the return of Israel in the 20th century truly a work of God, or is it a result of a cosmic chess move to deceive the elect by the adversary?

Showing posts with label rent. Show all posts
Showing posts with label rent. Show all posts

Sunday, April 24, 2016

Gold is money: New court ruling in Ohio allows for return of gold clauses in rental agreements

Ever since the Federal government took the U.S. off he gold standard in 1971, political and financial agencies have tried their best to program the American people to believe that gold has no monetary value.  This of course was done to ensure trust and confidence in the fiat Federal Reserve Note, and to propagate the illusion that debt was money, which allowed for a continued expansion of both the currency and government spending.

But an interesting court ruling last month in Ohio may be changing society's belief in gold as a Federal judge ruled that rents tied to gold clauses are now once again legal after nearly 80 years of being deemed null and void following the confiscation of gold in 1933.

A gold clause is an agreement where the rent of a commercial property can be raised or lowered in accordance to the price of gold at the time of renewal.  And for the agreement made in 1919 at the Commerce Building in downtown Columbus, OH, this means that the property holders can legally raise the rent on the business leasing the office space to a sum tied directly to the current price of gold, which now stands at around $1240 per ounce.


A Downtown Columbus office building is worth its weight in gold, according to a federal judge who upheld a nearly century-old lease that tied rent to the current price of the metal.
Last month’s ruling means rent paid by the company leasing the Commerce Building at 35 E. Gay St. from a group of five property owners could jump from $6,000 annually to more than $300,000. 
At issue is a so-called “gold clause” included in the original 1919 lease. The provision, common at the time, linked rent to the price of gold to account for inflation, similar to today’s consumer price index. 
“This really is a vindication of property rights,” said Washington, D.C.-based attorney Peter Patterson, who represents the five owners. 
In 1919, the value of gold was $20.67 per ounce, compared to more than $1,200 per ounce today. The property owners have been charging a yearly rent of $6,000 since that original lease, which was assumed by Commonwealth Investments in 1990. 
That deal, Patterson argued in a 2014 lawsuit, has resulted in a windfall for the group, since their more than 40 tenants are charged $900,000 annually. 
In 1933, in the midst of the Depression, the gold clauses were prohibited as part of efforts to reform the monetary system, which also included a ban on private ownership of gold from 1934 until 1973. - Columbus Dispatch
While this isolated event has little intrinsic effect on lease agreements as a whole, it opens the door for the growing movement by individual states and agencies who are working hard to see a return to gold backed money.  And with the current front-runner in the race for the Presidency already having accepted gold as a deposit for a lease in one of his New York commercial buildings, the likelihood of gold returning to its original monetary form becomes more and more a reality in the very near future.

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Forecast for holiday retail sales down as American’s spending most of their money on rent and Obamacare

We have already seen 3rd quarter retail numbers crash on Wall Street as companies like Macy’s, Fossil, and Nordstrom’s came in with double digit revenue declines, leading many analysts to forecast a bad holiday retail season leading up to Christmas and the end of the year.  But the reality is that the consumer is spending much less on things like apparel and other discretionary items because they are being bogged down with much higher costs in both rents and healthcare.
The Fed loves to discount inflationary numbers that are tied to consumers and the general economy, and instead prop up deflation within the sphere of Wall Street assets and commodities.  And if the real rate of inflation was correctly reported for the entire economy, it would not be languishing at the 2% number the Fed is using to justify their monetary policies, but along the lines of 8-10% per month in vital areas such as food, education, healthcare, and housing.

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Monday, September 28, 2015

Germany kicking people out of their own residences to give to refugees

After the truth about the mass European refugee event has become public now for a few weeks, one has to wonder why leaders within the EU would be willing to tear the union apart by forcing countries to take in Islamic and foreign aliens, especially when many are not even Syrian, or homeless because of the Syrian Civil War.
But even with this being said, and with an ongoing clash raging between stable EU nations and fringe ones like Hungary, Germany appears to be fully into the false narrative as now there are reports of government officials kicking out long-standing citizens from their rented apartments to provide space for the massive influx of alien refugees.

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Friday, September 4, 2015

The economy is so great that the common man can’t afford to live in his own city anymore

As the stock market today continues to show breakdowns all across Wall Street, Main Street has been in a continuous decline since the Credit Crash of 2008.  And although the fake unemployment numbers that are reported by the government are painted to be around 5.3%, the sad reality in this new waiter vs. manufacturing ‘recovery’ is that thanks to inflated prices in the housing and rental markets, the average American can no longer afford to live in even the most inexpensive of cities.
Low-income workers and their families do not earn enough to live in even the least expensive metropolitan American communities, according to a new analysis of families’ living costs published Wednesday.
The analysis, released by the left-leaning Economic Policy Institute, is an annual update of the think tank’s Family Budget Calculator that reflects new 2014 data. The Family Budget Calculator is a formula designed to determine the income “required for families to attain a secure yet modest standard of living” in 618 different communities across the country that the U.S. Census Bureau defines as metropolitan areas. The formula uses data collected by the government and some nonprofit groups to measure costs of housing, food, child care, transportation, health care, “other necessities” like clothing, and taxes for families of 10 different compositions in these specific locales. - Huffington Post



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Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Realtors moving from home sales to rental property management

As we enter into the 4th year of the bursting of the housing bubble, a change in the paradigm of property management is being forged as Americans move away from home ownership and back to renting.

Just as the U.S. housing boom gave birth to such homebuyer websites as Zillow Inc. and Redfin Corp., services for rental properties are thriving following a surge in foreclosures and stiffening of mortgage standards. Membership in the National Association of Residential Property Managers has almost doubled in five years to a record 3,400 members, according to the Chesapeake, Virginia-based trade group.
“We are riding this sea change in how housing is changing in the U.S.,” said Reggie Brown, chief executive officer of All Property Management LLC, a Seattle-based Web service that sells property managers leads on homeowners who want to lease out their properties. “The only growth is rentals.”
Renter household formation surpassed new owner-occupied homes in 2007 for the first time since 1985 and has held the lead since, according to U.S. Census Bureau data. An average of 718,500 renter households a year were formed from 2007 to 2010, while owner-occupied households decreased at an average annual rate of 147,250 during the same period.  - Bloomberg

More than anything, this trend proves the failure of a government policy which attempted to open up home ownership to a sector of Americans who could not afford to buy, and by doing so, created a housing bubble and credit crisis that may take a decade or more to sort out.  The good side of all of this, is there are millions of new homes, some which are in the McMansion categories, that are available all around the country for a relatively decent lease rate.