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Showing posts with label modi. Show all posts
Showing posts with label modi. Show all posts

Friday, March 24, 2017

Legislator in India's ruling party asks finance ministry to investigate whether Bitcoin is a Ponzi Scheme

In the land that doesn't really appear to care at all about the wants, desires, and needs of their people when it comes to money, on March 24 a member of India's ruling political party sent a request to the Minister of Finance to investigate whether Bitcoin is a ponzi scheme in the wake of its volatile price nature, and the potential rise of its by citizens within their economy.

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Kirit Somaiya, a Member of Parliament of the ruling BJP in India, has raised concerns about Bitcoin being a Ponzi scheme. The rapid rise of Bitcoin has attracted attention in India, coming as it does during the government’s experiment with demonetization. 
Dr. Somaiya has written to the Finance Ministry, the Reserve Bank of India and the SEBI (Securities and Exchange Board of India) on the increasing use of an unregulated currency in India. The finance minister is expected to officially reply shortly.
Speaking in the Parliament, Kirit Somaiya said: 
“The use of Bitcoin, a hypothetical currency, is increasing at a rapid speed in India as well as in the world. Experts have expressed concern that Bitcoin is a pyramid Ponzi-type scheme. This issue should be taken very seriously and there is urgent need to have a study on the development of Bitcoin in India. There is no regulator. As it is functioning like currency and seems like Ponzi scheme, RBI and SEBI as well as Finance Ministry to take appropriate step to save the people from another big Ponzi fraud.” - Coin Telegraph
India has embarked over the past few months on a policy towards creating a cashless society, and banning the use of cash in many transactions.  And the advent of a decentralized currency like Bitcoin is an anathema to Prime Minister Modi's agenda to try to control every aspect of the nation's spending through the implementation of a digital monetary system.

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

As India's Reserve Bank works to create a cashless society using the blockchain, they are also looking to outlaw Bitcoin

There is a famous axiom that goes, don't steal as the government hates competition.  And this appears very much to be in play in the country of India where the Reserve Bank of India (RBI), or the nation's central bank, is working hard to bring about a cashless society using blockchain technology while at the same time issuing edicts to try to outlaw Bitcoin.

Last November, India's Prime Minister suddenly and without warning started to redeem currency bills from the public and the country's monetary system.  And in a speech given during his monthly address to the nation, he explicitly said his end goal was to bring everyone under a cashless or near cashless monetary system.

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"I want to tell my small merchant brothers and sisters, this is the chance for you to enter the digital world," Modi said speaking in Hindi, urging them to use mobile banking applications and credit-card swipe machines. 
"It's correct that a 100 percent cashless society is not possible. But why don't we make a beginning for a less-cash society in India?," Modi said. "We can gradually move from a less-cash society to a cashless society." 
More than 90 percent of consumer purchases in India are transacted in cash, Credit Suisse estimates. While a smartphone boom and falling mobile data prices have led to a surge in digital payments in recent years, the base still remains low. 
Modi urged technology-savvy young people to spare some time teaching others how to use digital payment platforms. - Zerohedge
Fast forward to Feb. 5...

The RBI issued a statement and a warning on Sunday where the central bank acknowledged that they, along with member banks, are pursuing a digital monetary system to replace the cash economy with a digital system primarily using blockchain technology.  And one of their largest points of emphasis was to severely admonish the use of Bitcoin, which is in line with a similar warning they issued on the crypto-currency back in 2013.
“The RBI advises that it has not given any license/authorization to any entity/company to operate such schemes or deal with Bitcoin or any virtual currency. As such, any user, holder, investor, trader, etc., dealing with virtual currencies will be doing so at their own risk.”
The Indian government, as well as the central bank, are fighting a populist rebellion against their war on cash, and their push towards an all digital cashless society.  And Prime Minister Modi has continually issued policy edicts over the past few months in an attempt to try to halt citizens from dispensing of their currency in the forms of gold, jewelry, and even Bitcoin.

And although governments around the world for the most part have tried benign capital controls to slow down the use of Bitcoin, none as yet have actually considered the crypto-currency a threat, and have attempted to ban or outlaw its use by the people.

Until now.  And this should tell you that India's push to ban cash from the hands of the people is more a battle against freedom than it is a battle against corruption, money laundering, or even the spurious claim of 'fighting terrorism'.

Friday, February 3, 2017

India's next monetary restriction is to limit the amount of cash allowed for transactions

The world's seventh largest economy has suddenly become a petri dish for monetary experimentation towards the end goal of bringing about a cashless society.

Beginning in November of last year, Prime Minister Modi banned the two largest denominations of their currency, causing utter havoc as 1.3 billion people scrambled to exchange their bills before a December 15th deadline.  This move was then quickly followed by capital controls which only allowed individuals to take out the equivalent of $60 per day from their bank accounts.

Then earlier this week the Modi government began compiling a study to create a universal basic income for every citizen in the country.  This of course would force everyone, even the several hundred million who don't have access to the internet, to become part of a cashless financial system.

And finally on Feb. 1 a member of Modi's finance office submitted a proposal that would make it illegal for individuals to use cash for purchases and transactions larger than the equivalent of $4500.

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India's war against black money has led to several new policies and orders of late, one of which was announced by Finance Minister Arun Jaitley on Wednesday in his Union Budget presentation in the Parliament. 
The country has banned all cash transactions above Rs 300,000 (roughly $4,500) from April 1. 
This move follows last year's ban on high-value currency notes that had sucked in 86% of the cash in circulation and sent India's 1.3 billion people into a collective frenzy. - AOL Finance

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

After confiscating much of the nation's wealth, India's government wants to give it back to the people as welfare

After implementing a sudden monetary policy that wiped out a great deal of the people's wealth and set back the economy several years, India's Prime Minister now is looking at trying to save his election chances by offering up free money to the people under the guise of a Universal Basic Income.

In late 2016, Modi declared the two largest currency denominations no longer legal tender overnight, and gave the 1.3 billion inhabitants approximately a month to turn their currency into the banks.  In response to this, the Indian people rebelled with many of them trying to exchange their currency for gold and gold jewelry rather than deposit them in the banking system that less than 40% of the population actually trusts.

Three months later, and with support falling everyday for the Prime Minister, the government is now rushing to implement a new policy which would accelerate the digitization of their monetary system, while also attempting to be benevolent by introducing free monthly welfare checks to large portions of the population.

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Prime Minister Narendra Modi shocked his country and the world in November 2016 by announcing that he would fight corruption by rendering 86 percent of the country's currency worthless. The decision wreaked havoc with India's economy for several months, but Subramanian believes that the worst is over, now that plans for a remonetisation are in place. 
"Briefly, the costs include a contraction in cash money supply and subsequent, albeit temporary, slowdown in GDP growth; and benefits include increased digitalization, greater tax compliance and a reduction in real estate prices, which could increase long-run tax revenue collections and GDP growth," the report reads. 
The report also lobbied for a Universal Basic Income (UBI) program to replace India's innumerable social-welfare programs. India has over a thousand such measures, but UBI could replace them all in a system virtually impossible to exploit.  
A UBI in India would provide every citizen, regardless of net worth, a monthly payment with no strings attached. It can be used to provide for basic needs, the theory being that it will be enough to prevent poverty, giving recipients the ability to seek education and recover from economic hardship. - Sputnik News

Thursday, January 5, 2017

India's new scheme of free money to all could be the carrot to coerce people to get into their banking system

Over the past month, India's Prime Minister has used the stick on his people in an attempt to force them to give up their cash and move all commerce into a systematic financial process that could be monitored and taxed by government authorities.  This of course led to a massive backlash as a society that for centuries has run primarily on cash, and where only 36% of the population even has a bank account, rushed instead to exchange their currency for gold rather than deposit their cash into the banks.

Now however, Prime Minister Modi appears to be switching his stick for the carrot and is using a different means to try to entice India's 1.4 billion people into the banking system by proposing a scheme of free money, or a Universal Basic Income, to get a large portion of the population reliant upon the government and more amenable to buying into their financial system.

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The Indian government is likely to introduce Universal Basic Income, a practice of paying every person a fixed sum of money as a means to stimulate the economy and improve the quality of life of its citizens, according to the concept’s leading proponent. 
The Indian government is preparing a report documenting that a Universal Basic Income (UBI) is "feasible" and "basically the way forward," according to professor Guy Standing, a leading advocate for UBI, and the leader of the Basic Income Earth Network movement (BIEN). - Sputnik News
UBI schemes come with many pro's and con's, but most significantly the outcome of such programs depends upon the disposition of a people and culture.  For example, in Finland where they have just enacted a universal basic income system, the majority of recipients have surveyed that they still intend to work at the same time they receive the extra money, and this speaks highly to the diligence of the culture where a UBI scheme may work in the short run.  Yet on the other side, having a nation like France or even the United States where large portions of the population have lived off of welfare for generations, a promise of free money will not change the landscape of increasing the incentive to both work and receive extra income, but instead simply replace one form of welfare with another.

The ultimate goal of the Universal Basic Income system is to try to get everyone reliant upon the government, and their money stored in the banks where at a later time the ultimate agenda of a cashless society can be instituted.  But to do this it may take a financial crisis of epic proportion to achieve this, and that may be coming much sooner than people could imagine.

Saturday, December 17, 2016

India's war on cash and gold through capital controls not as simple is it seems for the future of their economy

Many in the alternative media, including this author, have seen the outrage engendered by the Indian people over Prime Minister Modi's intrusive measures of capital controls where he has virtually declared war on both cash and gold.  And without a doubt, the attempts by Modi to wean the people off their long-standing traditions of a purely cash economy were done with little planning or thought of the consequences they would trigger.

But when you look below the surface you will find that this policy, albeit through a slower and more methodical way, may actually be necessary if not vital to the future of India as it attempts to grow its economy into an international power.

Since 98% of India's commerce is currently done using only cash, it is virtually impossible to determine the true amount of capital that would be available for the country to expand in both growth and investment since the majority of the nation's wealth resides outside their financial system.  And this has been one of the reasons why India has acted primarily as the world's labor pool rather than as a true economic power.

Yet despite their large GDP which ranks them number seven in the world, they still remain behind economies such as China, the EU, the U.S., Hong Kong, and even Russia in growth potential.

Make in India

Earlier this year Prime Minister Modi created a program to try to entice business creation and expansion into India, using their relatively well educated and vast labor pool as the sweetner.  And this move was to try to end a long-standing trend where most of the best and brightest inevitably left India for better opportunities in Europe, Asia, and the U.S..

However, Modi's Make in India program has accomplished only minimal results at best, and in part this has been due to their antiquated financial system, and the fact that most workers expect to be paid in cash rather than through a formal banking mechanism.

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The Indian economy is at a critical inflection point in its modern history. India’s GDP growth has accelerated to become the fastest of all major economies in the world, with income levels today at China’s c.10 years ago, it is expected that India is now the next big story. Given its favorable demographics and other resources, India has the inherent drivers to sustain 7-8% growth over the medium to long term and the potential to achieve 10%. 
An India that can sustainably harness its core assets and create new ones has the potential to emerge as one of the key drivers of growth and stability in a world faced with increasing global economic and geopolitical uncertainty. In order to attain this position, however, India will need to do what China has historically excelled at, creating significant population-wide savings and channeling these into (reasonably) efficient assets to deliver competitive returns. Doing this requires a robust financial machine ready to finance the nation’s growth. 
Despite the significant growth and evolution of its financial services industry, India’s financial sector continues to be hamstrung by major structural inefficiencies, including an old fashioned state-dominated banking system and, despite increasingly aggressive changes, a lack of financial inclusion for large parts of the population. It is a sector in need of a new vision as the basis of a restructuring so it can play its part in India’s new growth story. 
Recent years have seen a concerted effort by both the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) and the Modi-led government to rapidly grow financial inclusion and bring more and more of India’s poor into the formal banking system. The country’s technology sector has also made a significant contribution by developing delivery systems that reduce transaction costs and spread access by leveraging growing smartphone penetration. 
However, as various factors including the large pile-up of stressed assets in the banking system, the sharp slowdown in industrial credit growth and other measures of inefficiency of the financial system indicate, India still faces significant challenges in creating an effective financial system if it is to stride more aggressively towards its potential. 
While addressing these challenges will undoubtedly be a painful process and require the expenditure of political capital, the prize is significant: potential incremental growth of 2-3% p.a. would set India’s growth on the path to achieve the double digit levels necessary to replicate China’s economic miracle. - Great Pacific Capital
India is hamstrung by the fact that they are a nation steeped deeply in tradition, and it takes decades if not centuries for serious changes to occur.  And this is why Modi's recent move to ban certain denominations of the Rupee in a very short amount of time has resulted in the population rebelling against the policy, and entrenching their distrust in banks to even greater levels.

It is a difficult act to change the confidence of a people in an institution when their natural reaction is to go on the defensive, especially when that policy is instigated from a government that has a history of corruption.  Yet if India is ever going to move ahead and reach their full potential in the global economic system, then both the people and the government will have to find some way to compromise, otherwise India will remain simply a labor pool for the world's other economic powers, and continue to be considered only a second world economy which helps grow the overall wealth of everyone else.

Wednesday, December 7, 2016

India takes war on cash to next level as they begin direct raids and confiscation of gold, jewelry, and cash from the people

Make no mistake, the government of India has declared war on its people, and only time will tell if their actions lead to a full scale revolution.

Back in November Prime Minister Modi declared the top two denominations of currency to no longer be valid as legal tender, and the populace had until Dec. 15 to turn in their monetary notes to their local bank.  However, this was met with a combination of trepidation and anger as the Indian economy runs primary on cash for transactions, with an estimated 98% of all commerce occurring using physical currency.

In response Modi suddenly cut short the time frame in which the people could trade in their now outdated bills and as a result, the people have rushed to jewelers to trade their stash of currency for gold and gold products.

And now we are finding out that the initial war on cash has suddenly shifted to a total war on wealth, or at the very least, a war on gold as news of armed raids on people, their homes, and their gold by the government is coming out from on the ground reports.

Global financial repression picks up steam, led by India. After declaring large denomination notes illegal, India now targets gold. 
It’s not just gold bars or bullion. The government has raided houses, no questions asked, confiscating jewelry. 
For background to this article, please see my November 27 article Cash Chaos in India, 86% of Money in Circulation Withdrawn; Cash Still King in Japan. 
Large denomination means 500-rupee ($7.30) and 1,000-rupee notes ($14.60), which account for more than 85 percent of the money supply. They are no longer legal tender, effective immediately. 
As one might imagine, chaos ensued. And it continues. - Mish Talk

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

As the world currencies start to crater, India mulling banning of gold imports along with eliminating cash

Earlier this year, some establishment economists, along with academics and central bankers, began throwing out the proposal of banning cash as a way to allow for the backdoor expansion of currencies in monetary policy.  This of course received a huge backlash by the citizenry of several countries, and in some cases led to a run on banks from those fearing theft through negative interest rates, or through the implementation of draconian capital controls.

Surprisingly, one of the countries that was least likely to show signs of a currency collapse until recently was that of India.  And as a strong emerging market nation who had just embarked on a massive Make in India campaign, their elimination last week of their two largest currency denominations stoked fears of their own government seeking a ban on cash, and has led millions to either take out their money from banking institutions, with much of the wealth going into gold.

But in a new article published on Nov. 16 at The Daily Bell, eliminating cash may be the first step towards absolute control over money as the Modi government is now mulling plans to stop gold from being imported into the country entirely.

Prime minister Narendra Modi recently decided to confiscate the cash of hundreds of millions of Indians, and now he may forbid Indians from importing gold. 
This would have an immediate effect on gold supplies as India, despite the affinity of citizens for gold and silver, has very little in the way of domestic mining. 
In part, this is because the government itself is consistently at war with Indian citizens over money and its control. This struggle has most recently manifested itself in India’s decision to remove, wholesale, large denomination bills from public circulation. 
The country [banned] 500 and 1000 rupee notes (worth about US$7 and $14 respectively) and the mooted import restriction [banning gold imports] could be a reaction to dealers swapping the notes for gold.IBJA national secretary Surendra Mehta told the Times of India its members should be ready.   “We hear from certain circles of this possibility, though nothing official is out yet,” he said. 
The larger issue here has to do with banning cash on a global level. It is typical of reporting in this modern era that few if any of the mainstream articles covering India’s most recent move seemingly mention this. 
Governments around the world are beginning to ban cash. Sweden is far advanced but Uruguay and now India are not far behind. Uruguay is soon to demand that employers cease to pay employees via cash and instead deposit paychecks directly in bank accounts. - Zerohedge
India is not the only nation looking hard at eliminating cash, or creating barriers for people to get their money out of banks and into something tangible that is outside the hands of government control.  And as the world rushes towards a currency or financial crisis worse than in 2008, the days are becoming numbered on you and an individual having a choice on what you can do with your own money.