The Israel Deception

Is the return of Israel in the 20th century truly a work of God, or is it a result of a cosmic chess move to deceive the elect by the adversary?

Showing posts with label india. Show all posts
Showing posts with label india. Show all posts

Saturday, June 3, 2017

India and Russia may soon conduct trade using bi-lateral currencies as India begins negotiations to join the Eurasian Economic Union

When the Chairman of the World Economic Forum (Davos) said earlier today at the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum (SPIEF) that the Russian based conference is now on par his own global confab, he wasn't pulling any punches because the reality is, SPIEF has become one of the most important global get-togethers between nations and businesses in the world.
Klaus Schwab, the founder and executive chairman of the Davos World Economic Forum (WEF), acknowledged that the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum (SPIEF) has now become as well-known and prestigious as WEF, Sberbank CEO German Gref said Saturday. 
MOSCOW (Sputnik) — The CEO of the largest Russian bank noted that a forum's success cannot be measured by the number of agreements signed at the event because a lot of work precedes any deal and a forum is only used as a platform for signing the agreement. 
"As a whole the forum, the organization of the forum is on a good level. The founder and head of the Davos World Economic Forum professor Schwab… said that if before we were transferring experience to the St. Petersburg Forum, now we can state that we are the two equal forums. It is a very high appraisal from a person who had created the largest forum in the world," Gref said. - Sputnik News
And as an example for just how much SPIEF has become economically important to global finance, on June 3 India signed on with Russia to conduct negotiations about joining up with the Eurasian Economic Union (EEU), and to perhaps one day soon begin conducting trade in each other's bi-lateral sovereign currencies.

The Russia-led Eurasian Economic Union (EAEU) and India signed a petition on the beginning of talks to establish a free trade area, a Sputnik correspondent reported Saturday. 
The petition was concluded during the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum (SPIEF) by Eurasian Economic Commission (EEC) Trade Minister Veronika Nikishina and India's Commerce and Industry Minister Nirmala Sitharaman. 
"We are at the very beginning of this road. Usually such difficult negotiations are carried out for several years. That is why we do not know when they will finish. But we will try to implement it in a reasonable timeframe. A period of two to three years will be a very successful result," Nikishina told Sputnik. - Sputnik News
Regarding bi-lateral currency use:
Moscow and New Delhi have not yet worked out details on when to introduce bilateral trade in national currencies, Nirmala Sitharaman, India's Minister of State for Commerce and Industry, told Sputnik on Saturday. 
On Thursday, Russia and India signed a joint declaration on coordinating efforts to introduce trade in national currencies to reduce dependence on other currencies.
India is the seventh largest global economy and already a member of the BRICS coalition.  So to have them embarking on a quest for de-dollarization when it comes to future trade agreements will manifest into an incredibly shocking blow to dollar hegemony.

Friday, May 5, 2017

As gold demand comes down 18% globally for Q1, China and India are still buying like crazy

On May 4 the World Gold Council reported their year over year Q1 numbers for gold demand and saw a huge global decline of 18% from the prior first quarter in 2016.  However, this drop only appears to be primarily in the West as both China and India saw large spikes in buying during the same period.
A slower pace of central bank buying helped push gold demand down 18% year-on-year in the first quarter, according to the World Gold Council
Gold Demand Trends quarterly report showed global gold demand was 1,034.5 tonnes, with the year-on-year decline reflecting the strength of the first quarter of 2016 (which was the strongest ever first quarter). - Barrons
Chinese Q1 numbers:

China's demand for gold bars and coins soared 30 percent year-on-year to 105.9 metric tons in the first quarter of this year, the fourth strongest quarter on record, according to a report released by the World Gold Council on Thursday. 
Overall demand for gold in the Chinese market grew 8 percent year-on-year to 282.4 tons, making China the world's top gold consumer, according to WGC data.
Global demand for gold in the quarter was 1,034.5 tons, an 18 percent year-on-year decrease from the record high level recorded for the first quarter of 2016. - China Post
Indian Q1 numbers:
Gold demand in India increased by 15 per cent during the first quarter of 2017 to 123.5 tonne, signalling a return of optimism in the industry, according to World Gold Council (WGC). 
The total gold demand in the country stood at 107.3 tonne in the January-March of 2016, impacted by jewellers' strike over excise duty introduction. - India Times

Monday, April 17, 2017

After a decline due to Modi's cash banning scheme, India's gold importing soars in in first quarter of 2017

In the latest report out of India for the first quarter of 2017, the world's largest gold consumer market saw a return of soaring imports of the precious metal following a 4th quarter decline due in part to Prime Minister Modi's attempts to ban most cash.

During the first three months of this year, gold imports were for 230 tons, which is nearly as much as the period between April and November last year when the government instituted a cash ban and a new scheme to bring about a cashless society.

Sentiment has turned up in the gold market the last few weeks. And new data from the world’s top consuming center — India — shows there may indeed be cause for optimism amongst bullion buyers. 
Data reported in the local press showed that India’s gold imports saw a big jump during the most recent quarter, January to March 2017. With total imports for the period hitting 230 tonnes. 
To put that in perspective, consider some numbers from recent quarters — during which India’s gold imports showed some of the weakest figures on record. 
During April to October 2016, gold imports totalled just 264 tonnes. Meaning that incoming shipments for that entire seven-month period were barely above the figures for the most recent three months. 
That suggests a major surge in gold demand is happening here. In fact, imports for the Jan-Mar 2017 quarter were the strongest for those months since 2013. - Oil Price
Since the beginning of the year, gold has climbed by more than 11% from $1148 on Jan. 1 to nearly $1300 following last weekend's trading.

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Russia potentially changing stance on legality of Bitcoin and other crypto currencies

For the most part, Russia has been vehemently against Bitcoin and any other crypto-currencies, primarily because of their unregulated nature.  And even without the use of decentralized digital money within their borders, the Eurasian power constantly deals with other types of monetary problems that fall under the umbrella of 'money laundering' and other illicit activities.

But on April 11 this may slowly be changing as a Deputy Finance Minster for the government provided a ray of hope for the crypto-currency community as he announced that Bitcoin and other forms of digital money could actually become legalized as early as next year.

Cryptocurrencies may be recognized in Russia by 2018, according to Deputy Finance Minister Aleksey Moiseev. 
Moiseev says monitoring cryptocurrencies could be an instrumental tool against money laundering, and Bitcoin and other digital currencies could be recognized by next year as the central bank works with the government to develop rules against illegal transfers. 
The state needs to know who at every moment of time stands on both sides of the financial chain,” Moiseev said in an interview, as cited Bloomberg. “If there’s a transaction, the people who facilitate it should understand from whom they bought and to whom they were selling, just like with bank operations.” 
Last year the idea of a national cryptocurrency had been considered by the Ministry of Finance and the Central Bank, which would see the banning of all other virtual currencies in Russia. The idea had not been discussed by the Kremlin, however, according to Presidential Press Secretary Dmitry Peskov at the time. 
Russian officials had been opposing all virtual currencies, arguing their cross-border nature, transaction anonymity and lack of a supervisory body makes them the perfect vehicle for illegal transactions. - Russia Today
Bitcoin and other crypto-currencies have experienced a wild ride over the past year, with some nations such as India outright banning it completely as the government seeks to bring about their own version of a cashless society, while over in Japan the government has come to fully embrace its use by its citizens and businesses.

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Bitcoin outlawed and users could be considered to be money launderers in India according to central bank

There was a huge hit on March 28 for Bitcoin proponents as a nation with nearly 20% of the world's population has officially declared the crypto-currency to be an outlaw form of money, and that users of Bitcoin could be considered to be money launderers.

In a statement made by the Indian government in collaboration with comments made recently by their central bank, use of any virtual currency other than the Rupee is to be considered unathorized and users to be assumed as money launderers upon investigation.

The government today said use of virtual currencies like Bitcoins is not authorised by RBI and could result in breach of anti-money laundering provisions. 
The RBI has already cautioned users, holders and traders of virtual currency, including Bitcoin, about the potential financial, legal and security risks arising from the usage. 
"The absence of counter parties in usage of virtual currencies including Bitcoins, for illicit and illegal activities in anonymous/pseudonymous systems could subject the users to unintentional breaches of anti-money laundering and combating the financing of terrorism laws," Minister of State for Finance, Arjun Ram Meghwal, said in a written reply in the Rajya Sabha. 
He further said that the creation of virtual currencies like Bitcoins as a medium of payments is not authorised by any central bank or monetary authority. - Economic Times of India
Over the past several months the Modi government has enacted several monetary policies meant to go after tax evaders, buyers of gold and other hard assets, as well as force individuals into the banking system where he hopes to one day soon bring about a cashless society.  And of course the threat of alternative currencies like Bitcoin go absolutely against his and the Indian central bank's monetary agendas.

Saturday, March 25, 2017

First the stick and now the carrot as India to offer rewards for citizens who get rid of cash for digital payments

Back in November of last year India's Prime Minister shocked his 1.3 billion citizens by suddenly declaring the two largest denominations of the Rupee to no longer be valid legal tender.  This in turn caused a massive rush from the people to exchange their currency for hard assets such as gold and jewelry rather than to simply fall in line by turning in their money to their nearest banks.

And while some Indians have accepted the Modi plan of creating a new cashless society, many still are fighting to sustain their long tradition of transacting in physical cash.

So while the past few months have seen the government not only confiscate cash, but also invade private residences of those who might be harboring banned currency, one Chief Minister is now shifting gears by offering rewards to citizens who eagerly move towards digital finance, as he seeks make the city of Gao the world's first completely cashless municipality.

Porvorim: Chief minister Manohar Parrikar, while presenting the annual state budget on Friday, announced that his government intended to carry on with the on-going nation-wide drive to make the economy as much cashless as possible. 
"The government will encourage digital payments and make it financially rewarding. I propose to formulate an appropriate policy in order to discourage cash transactions," Parrikar said, adding that the government would be strengthening the state's IT infrastructure to permeate high-speed broadband connectivity to every corner of Goa in the next two years. 
Following the decision to demonetize Rs 500 and Rs 1,000 notes, the then defence minister had envisaged Goa as the first state in India to become a cashless society. He had set a deadline of December 31, 2017, to achieve the target. 
"Goa will be the first to become a cashless society in India. We have to support the Prime Minister's dream," Parrikar had said in November, adding that one can do anything once he/she has registered her/his mobile number with a bank under the central government unified payment interference. - India Times

Friday, March 24, 2017

Legislator in India's ruling party asks finance ministry to investigate whether Bitcoin is a Ponzi Scheme

In the land that doesn't really appear to care at all about the wants, desires, and needs of their people when it comes to money, on March 24 a member of India's ruling political party sent a request to the Minister of Finance to investigate whether Bitcoin is a ponzi scheme in the wake of its volatile price nature, and the potential rise of its by citizens within their economy.

Image result for government control bitcoin
Kirit Somaiya, a Member of Parliament of the ruling BJP in India, has raised concerns about Bitcoin being a Ponzi scheme. The rapid rise of Bitcoin has attracted attention in India, coming as it does during the government’s experiment with demonetization. 
Dr. Somaiya has written to the Finance Ministry, the Reserve Bank of India and the SEBI (Securities and Exchange Board of India) on the increasing use of an unregulated currency in India. The finance minister is expected to officially reply shortly.
Speaking in the Parliament, Kirit Somaiya said: 
“The use of Bitcoin, a hypothetical currency, is increasing at a rapid speed in India as well as in the world. Experts have expressed concern that Bitcoin is a pyramid Ponzi-type scheme. This issue should be taken very seriously and there is urgent need to have a study on the development of Bitcoin in India. There is no regulator. As it is functioning like currency and seems like Ponzi scheme, RBI and SEBI as well as Finance Ministry to take appropriate step to save the people from another big Ponzi fraud.” - Coin Telegraph
India has embarked over the past few months on a policy towards creating a cashless society, and banning the use of cash in many transactions.  And the advent of a decentralized currency like Bitcoin is an anathema to Prime Minister Modi's agenda to try to control every aspect of the nation's spending through the implementation of a digital monetary system.

Friday, February 24, 2017

Is South Africa looking to become the next BRICS nation to go cashless?

Over the past four months we have seen India begin the difficult process of weaning her people off of physical cash, as Prime Minister Modi has officially called for the implementation of a digital monetary system.  Then earlier this week we began to hear word that Russia was investigating the taxing of individuals who chose to use cash in transactions and other commerce.

Now on Feb. 24 we can add South Africa to the growing list of BRICS nations who might be setting the stage for eliminating physical cash in their economies and creating a completely digital monetary system.

Image result for africans want digital currency
Globally, cash, as a means of transaction, has been on the decline for decades.
First World countries are leading the transition. 
In emerging market countries, such as China, South Africa and India, for example, more than 90% of payments are still cash based. 
We have also seen how quickly, thanks to our almost complete mobile penetration, blockchain technology, such as Bitcoin has taken off in South Africa across all strata of our economy. 
These are signs that South Africa’s transition to a cashless environment could happen very quickly indeed. - Biz Community
Unlike the forced banning of cash which we have seen in India, and may soon see in Russia, the move towards digital money in South Africa may instead come from a voluntary push as citizens trust less and less in the nation's primary sovereign currency.

Monday, February 20, 2017

Nationwide biometrics to be at the heart of India's move to a cashless society

A few years ago India began a push to accumulate and digitize the biometric information of its 1.3 billion citizens.  And with their 'India Stack' database now ready for distribution, the government is planning on selling access to this information to web developers, healthcare providers, and even the financial system as it becomes a key component of Prime Minister Modi's push towards a cashless society.

Image result for minority report india
Courtesy of 20th century Fox/Dreamworks
India is leapfrogging into the digital future by offering the world’s largest biometric-identity database for use by tech firms, healthcare providers and novice app developers — an opportunity that excites fans of cyber transactions but worries privacy advocates. 
The Indian government has gathered digital-identification records, including fingerprint impressions and eye scans, of nearly all of its 1.2 billion citizens. 
Now a government-backed initiative known as “India Stack” aims to standardise ways to exchange the data digitally to facilitate the transfer of signatures and official documents that citizens need to get jobs, make financial transactions or access government services. 
The government gave cashless commerce a push late last year by withdrawing large-denomination bank notes from circulation. The temporary measure, aimed in part at tax dodgers, prompted a sharp rise in the use of mobile payment apps. 
India Stack is touted as key to creating a “presence-less, paperless, cashless” society. But the approach is viewed as both innovative and, some say, risky. - The Australian
With India acting as the petri dish for both a cashless monetary system, and a global biometric database of information that corporations, intelligence agencies, and law enforcement can access at any given moment, the results of this experiment may soon become the Big Brother apparatus of global government, and remove the last vestiges of freedom a citizen has.

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

South Korea is the newest country seeking to eliminate cash and wants to do so by 2020

First it was Sweden, who's people are so intoxicated by technology that it was not very difficult to get them to give up their cash to run on an entirely electronic financial system.  Then in November India decided to jump on the Cashless Society bandwagon, only unlike their counterparts living in the Northern part of Europe, their citizens are the exact opposite and do not trust their government or banking system to take away physical cash from the economy.

Thus when it comes to creating a world without physical money it is on par with how half the world is content to be as sheep and follow the globalists desire to control every aspect of their spending, saving, and investing, while the other half is infused with the frequency of Populism, and realize that without the ability to control your own money in a physical form, then nearly all freedoms are permanently lost to the whims of elected and un-elected officials.


As we are now well into the first quarter of 2017, and living in the aftermath of Brexit and the election of Donald Trump, the battle is on for the establishment to hold onto the status quo, while at the same time fighting a populist movement that seeks to tear down their power base built upon a foundation of debt, credit, and privately owned central banks.  And at the fore are two more major economies push strongly towards a cashless monetary system.

And those two entities are the European Union, and South Korea.
“Hand over your money.” That’s what the Financial Times newspaper called it. But it might as well be rephrased as “Stick ’em up!”

It appears that the Central Bank of Korea, South Korea’s central bank, plans to withdraw all coins by 2020, followed by removing all bank notes soon afterwards. No feedback has been requested from the public.

South Korea is determined to become a cashless society, exclusively using T-Money and other electronic payment cards. This goal may make sense to South Korea’s banks and government, but it is not without obstacles or resistance. - Numismaster
The ball is already rolling down the path towards a completely cashless society, where physical money is eliminated and your freedom to choose to spend, save, and invest as you see fit is at stake.  Which means that the clock is now ticking for anyone who is awake to transition their wealth out of this parasitic system before it is too late, and find alternatives in hard assets that act as money (gold, silver), or in a financial construct such as Bitcoin and Goldmoney, that allow you to keep your wealth in a structure that is outside the control of banks and government.

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

As India's Reserve Bank works to create a cashless society using the blockchain, they are also looking to outlaw Bitcoin

There is a famous axiom that goes, don't steal as the government hates competition.  And this appears very much to be in play in the country of India where the Reserve Bank of India (RBI), or the nation's central bank, is working hard to bring about a cashless society using blockchain technology while at the same time issuing edicts to try to outlaw Bitcoin.

Last November, India's Prime Minister suddenly and without warning started to redeem currency bills from the public and the country's monetary system.  And in a speech given during his monthly address to the nation, he explicitly said his end goal was to bring everyone under a cashless or near cashless monetary system.

Image result for ban bitcoin
"I want to tell my small merchant brothers and sisters, this is the chance for you to enter the digital world," Modi said speaking in Hindi, urging them to use mobile banking applications and credit-card swipe machines. 
"It's correct that a 100 percent cashless society is not possible. But why don't we make a beginning for a less-cash society in India?," Modi said. "We can gradually move from a less-cash society to a cashless society." 
More than 90 percent of consumer purchases in India are transacted in cash, Credit Suisse estimates. While a smartphone boom and falling mobile data prices have led to a surge in digital payments in recent years, the base still remains low. 
Modi urged technology-savvy young people to spare some time teaching others how to use digital payment platforms. - Zerohedge
Fast forward to Feb. 5...

The RBI issued a statement and a warning on Sunday where the central bank acknowledged that they, along with member banks, are pursuing a digital monetary system to replace the cash economy with a digital system primarily using blockchain technology.  And one of their largest points of emphasis was to severely admonish the use of Bitcoin, which is in line with a similar warning they issued on the crypto-currency back in 2013.
“The RBI advises that it has not given any license/authorization to any entity/company to operate such schemes or deal with Bitcoin or any virtual currency. As such, any user, holder, investor, trader, etc., dealing with virtual currencies will be doing so at their own risk.”
The Indian government, as well as the central bank, are fighting a populist rebellion against their war on cash, and their push towards an all digital cashless society.  And Prime Minister Modi has continually issued policy edicts over the past few months in an attempt to try to halt citizens from dispensing of their currency in the forms of gold, jewelry, and even Bitcoin.

And although governments around the world for the most part have tried benign capital controls to slow down the use of Bitcoin, none as yet have actually considered the crypto-currency a threat, and have attempted to ban or outlaw its use by the people.

Until now.  And this should tell you that India's push to ban cash from the hands of the people is more a battle against freedom than it is a battle against corruption, money laundering, or even the spurious claim of 'fighting terrorism'.

Friday, February 3, 2017

India's next monetary restriction is to limit the amount of cash allowed for transactions

The world's seventh largest economy has suddenly become a petri dish for monetary experimentation towards the end goal of bringing about a cashless society.

Beginning in November of last year, Prime Minister Modi banned the two largest denominations of their currency, causing utter havoc as 1.3 billion people scrambled to exchange their bills before a December 15th deadline.  This move was then quickly followed by capital controls which only allowed individuals to take out the equivalent of $60 per day from their bank accounts.

Then earlier this week the Modi government began compiling a study to create a universal basic income for every citizen in the country.  This of course would force everyone, even the several hundred million who don't have access to the internet, to become part of a cashless financial system.

And finally on Feb. 1 a member of Modi's finance office submitted a proposal that would make it illegal for individuals to use cash for purchases and transactions larger than the equivalent of $4500.

Image result for no rupees for you
India's war against black money has led to several new policies and orders of late, one of which was announced by Finance Minister Arun Jaitley on Wednesday in his Union Budget presentation in the Parliament. 
The country has banned all cash transactions above Rs 300,000 (roughly $4,500) from April 1. 
This move follows last year's ban on high-value currency notes that had sucked in 86% of the cash in circulation and sent India's 1.3 billion people into a collective frenzy. - AOL Finance

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

After confiscating much of the nation's wealth, India's government wants to give it back to the people as welfare

After implementing a sudden monetary policy that wiped out a great deal of the people's wealth and set back the economy several years, India's Prime Minister now is looking at trying to save his election chances by offering up free money to the people under the guise of a Universal Basic Income.

In late 2016, Modi declared the two largest currency denominations no longer legal tender overnight, and gave the 1.3 billion inhabitants approximately a month to turn their currency into the banks.  In response to this, the Indian people rebelled with many of them trying to exchange their currency for gold and gold jewelry rather than deposit them in the banking system that less than 40% of the population actually trusts.

Three months later, and with support falling everyday for the Prime Minister, the government is now rushing to implement a new policy which would accelerate the digitization of their monetary system, while also attempting to be benevolent by introducing free monthly welfare checks to large portions of the population.

Image result for brother can you spare a rupee
Prime Minister Narendra Modi shocked his country and the world in November 2016 by announcing that he would fight corruption by rendering 86 percent of the country's currency worthless. The decision wreaked havoc with India's economy for several months, but Subramanian believes that the worst is over, now that plans for a remonetisation are in place. 
"Briefly, the costs include a contraction in cash money supply and subsequent, albeit temporary, slowdown in GDP growth; and benefits include increased digitalization, greater tax compliance and a reduction in real estate prices, which could increase long-run tax revenue collections and GDP growth," the report reads. 
The report also lobbied for a Universal Basic Income (UBI) program to replace India's innumerable social-welfare programs. India has over a thousand such measures, but UBI could replace them all in a system virtually impossible to exploit.  
A UBI in India would provide every citizen, regardless of net worth, a monthly payment with no strings attached. It can be used to provide for basic needs, the theory being that it will be enough to prevent poverty, giving recipients the ability to seek education and recover from economic hardship. - Sputnik News

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

The threat of the U.S. banning cash is not over as it becomes a topic at the Davos Economic Forum

Just when Americans thought they might be out of the woods from their government seeking to ban cash, a Nobel-Laureate economist participating at this year's Davos World Economic Forum has proven that to be incorrect.  In fact, the topic of banning cash in the U.S. as well as elsewhere around the world is on the menu of this week's forum, and Joseph Stiglitz is the chef serving that main course.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has already removed 86% of his country's currency from circulation in an attempt to curb tax evasion, tackle corruption and shut down the shadow economy.
Should the US follow suit? 
Joseph Stiglitz, Nobel Prize-winning economist, thinks so. Phasing out currency and moving towards a digital economy would, over the long term, have “benefits that outweigh the cost,” the Columbia University professor said on day one of the World Economic Forum's Annual Meeting in Davos
Stiglitz was speaking in the session Ending Corruption alongside Mark Pieth from the Basel Institute of Governance and APCO Worldwide Founder and Executive Chairman Margery Kraus. Stiglitz and Pieth co-authored a report, Overcoming the Shadow Economy, in November last year. 
Quantifying the scale of the problem, Stiglitz said: “You can put it into the context of one of the big issues being discussed in Davos this year - the backlash against globalization, the darker side of globalization ... The lack of transparency in global financial markets, the secrecy havens that the Panama Papers exposed, just reinforced what we already knew ... There is a global framework for both corruption and tax evasion and tax avoidance. 
“The fact that you can hide ill-gotten gains so easily in these secrecy havens really provides incentives for people to engage in this activity as they can get the economic returns and then enjoy the benefits of those returns. If there were not these secrecy havens then the benefits from engaging in these kinds of illicit activity would be much diminished.” 
One of the countries that has not done enough to fight corruption is the US, Stiglitz went on to say, and one remedy could be to phase out cash and embrace digital currencies. - World Economic Forum
Stiglitz, like two other economists (Larry Summers and Ken Rogoff) who spent 2016 promoting the end of cash to protect the failures of the central banks, sees taking away the freedoms that physical money provides all individuals as the only alternative to allow the Fed to begin negative interest rates.  However, like with nearly all Keynesian economists running Western monetary systems today, they ignore the real culprits behind the use of cash in illegal activities, and refuse to call out the very banks they wish to protect from when they were tightly involved in money laundering, and helping fund terrorism and the drug war.

As we have seen in India, the European Union, and Venezuela these past few months, governments are not afraid to eliminate currencies or formulate policies meant to ban cash entirely from an economy.  And this leaves the only recourse for the common man to simply opt out of the system, and get their wealth into physical gold, silver, or bitcoin, and offshore as much of it as possible so that it is outside the hands of the financiers who want to take it from you.

Friday, January 13, 2017

New study shows that U.S. behind India's War on Cash and using nation as petri dish to create cashless society

In a fantastic and well documented piece of research published by German economist Dr. Norbert Haering, the recent chaos going on in India regarding money and their monetary system is actually based on a policy out of Washington to use the world's seventh largest economy as an experiment to see how eliminating cash would effect a large population.

Last year we saw a Harvard P.H.D and a former Assistant Secretary of the Treasury write op-eds, white papers, and give speeches on the evils of using physical cash in commerce.  Yet these Ivory Tower 'academics' failed to mention that nearly all funding for terrorism, drug cartels, and money laundering was done at the sovereign and banking levels, and that indictments, imprisonments, and regulation of the bankers themselves would cut these illegal activities short in a New York minute.

However, at the heart of the growing 'war on cash' is the need for governments to crack down on individual freedoms and the ability of people to spend or save their money as they see fit, especially as the global banking and financial systems crater on the precipice of total collapse with negative interest rates, asset deflation, and a 325% debt to gdp ratio.

So it appears that the United States decided to run some test cases to see how the public would react to restrictions on using cash in commerce, and chose the one economy where 98% of all transactions are cash based, and where only 36% of the people even have a bank account.

Image result for war on cash
In early November, without warning, the Indian government declared the two largest denomination bills invalid, abolishing over 80 percent of circulating cash by value. Amidst all the commotion and outrage this caused, nobody seems to have taken note of the decisive role that Washington played in this. That is surprising, as Washington’s role has been disguised only very superficially. 
U.S. President Barack Obama has declared the strategic partnership with India a priority of his foreign policy. China needs to be reined in. In the context of this partnership, the US government’s development agency USAID has negotiated cooperation agreements with the Indian ministry of finance. One of these has the declared goal to push back the use of cash in favor of digital payments in India and globally. 
On November 8, Indian prime minster Narendra Modi announced that the two largest denominations of banknotes could not be used for payments any more with almost immediate effect. Owners could only recoup their value by putting them into a bank account before the short grace period expired at year end, which many people and businesses did not manage to do, due to long lines in front of banks. The amount of cash that banks were allowed to pay out to individual customers was severely restricted. 
Almost half of Indians have no bank account and many do not even have a bank nearby. The economy is largely cash based. Thus, a severe shortage of cash ensued. Those who suffered the most were the poorest and most vulnerable. They had additional difficulty earning their meager living in the informal sector or paying for essential goods and services like food, medicine or hospitals. Chaos and fraud reigned well into December. 
Four weeks earlier 
Not even four weeks before this assault on Indians, USAID had announced the establishment of “Catalyst: Inclusive Cashless Payment Partnership”, with the goal of effecting a quantum leap in cashless payment in India. The press statement of October 14 says that Catalyst “marks the next phase of partnership between USAID and Ministry of Finance to facilitate universal financial inclusion”. The statement does not show up in the list of press statements on the website of USAID (anymore?). Not even filtering statements with the word “India” would bring it up. To find it, you seem to have to know it exists, or stumble upon it in a web search. Indeed, this and other statements, which seemed rather boring before, have become a lot more interesting and revealing after November 8. 
Reading the statements with hindsight it becomes obvious, that Catalyst and the partnership of USAID and the Indian Ministry of Finance, from which Catalyst originated, are little more than fronts which were used to be able to prepare the assault on all Indians using cash without arousing undue suspicion. Even the name Catalyst sounds a lot more ominous, once you know what happened on November 9. 
Catalyst’s Director of Project Incubation is Alok Gupta, who used to be Chief Operating Officer of the World Resources Institute in Washington, which has USAID as one of its main sponsors. He was also an original member of the team that developed Aadhaar, the Big-Brother-like biometric identification system. 
According to a report of the Indian Economic Times, USAID has committed to finance Catalyst for three years. Amounts are kept secret. - Washington's Blog via Zerohedge
For those who don't know the history of USAID, it is a CIA front used in regime change activities and even assassinations throughout the 20th century.

What is going on in India is a calculated experiment to see how a population would react to the elimination of physical money, and the forced process of getting all currency and commerce into the banking system.  And as this experiment has originated from policies created by the U.S. government, it is not a stretch to believe that these same controls will be used on the American people one day in the future, and why Americans need to get their money out of banks and into physical assets both at home and offshore, before the inevitable day comes following the next planned crisis.

Saturday, January 7, 2017

War on cash in Greece, Australia, India, China, and Venezuela opening door for need to have gold and Bitcoin

2016 was the year where economic 'experts' dropped hints in newspaper op-ed's and university white papers on how governments needed to eliminate cash to sustain the debt bubbles central banks had created through their absurd monetary policies following the 2008 financial crisis.  And while many individuals pushed off the idea of banning physical cash as hyperbole and 'ivory tower' nonsense, by the end of the year at least three countries had begun testing this option, with two more implementing capital controls to achieve the same thing here in early 2017.

Image result for war on cash

In late November, India's Prime Minister Modi issued a sudden mandate where the largest two denominations of currency were being completely absolved, and that the people had until December 15 to turn in their bank notes for new script.  This led to an economic revolt where most people tried to exchange their money for gold or gold jewelry, shooting up the price in some cases to around $3600 per ounce.

This move in India was soon followed by the country of Venezuela, where President Maduro called for the elimination of the $100 Bolivar note to try to keep the Venezuelan people from using their near worthless money to buy food and other goods from neighboring Columbia.

Yet the questions one has to ask are, were these moves independent of one another, or were these nations being used as test cases to see how the public would react to restrictions on owning and using cash?

If we put these inquiries on the back shelf for the moment to look at two other nations instituting restrictions on cash through differing forms of capital controls, the most important focus should be on the reactions of the people to their governments restricting their ability to do as they please with their money, and in what assets they are moving into to escape those restrictions.

That answer of course is the movement of wealth into both gold and Bitcoin.

Image result for gold and bitcoin

In the case of India, people looked towards their long-standing tradition of physical gold, and helped created shortages as they lost nearly all confidence in their fiat money itself.  But over in China, where the government instituted capital controls restricting the offshoring of money in an attempt to counteract growing liquidity problems in their banking system, investors and individuals looked to Bitcoin as the quickest and most liquid way of transferring their Yuan into some other currency or asset outside their borders.

Heading into the second week of the new year, two additional countries are preparing to join in the war on cash and put their own peoples to the test on whether they will accept the elimination of cash, or if they will rebel en masse to this loss of economic freedom.  And for both Greeks and Australians, the coming days will see what their reactions will be and if they too will seek solace in alternative forms of money, or if they will simply accept the inevitable and quietly cede their personal sovereignty to function under a digital system run at the political whims of their governments.

Thursday, January 5, 2017

India's new scheme of free money to all could be the carrot to coerce people to get into their banking system

Over the past month, India's Prime Minister has used the stick on his people in an attempt to force them to give up their cash and move all commerce into a systematic financial process that could be monitored and taxed by government authorities.  This of course led to a massive backlash as a society that for centuries has run primarily on cash, and where only 36% of the population even has a bank account, rushed instead to exchange their currency for gold rather than deposit their cash into the banks.

Now however, Prime Minister Modi appears to be switching his stick for the carrot and is using a different means to try to entice India's 1.4 billion people into the banking system by proposing a scheme of free money, or a Universal Basic Income, to get a large portion of the population reliant upon the government and more amenable to buying into their financial system.

Image result for free money universal basic income
The Indian government is likely to introduce Universal Basic Income, a practice of paying every person a fixed sum of money as a means to stimulate the economy and improve the quality of life of its citizens, according to the concept’s leading proponent. 
The Indian government is preparing a report documenting that a Universal Basic Income (UBI) is "feasible" and "basically the way forward," according to professor Guy Standing, a leading advocate for UBI, and the leader of the Basic Income Earth Network movement (BIEN). - Sputnik News
UBI schemes come with many pro's and con's, but most significantly the outcome of such programs depends upon the disposition of a people and culture.  For example, in Finland where they have just enacted a universal basic income system, the majority of recipients have surveyed that they still intend to work at the same time they receive the extra money, and this speaks highly to the diligence of the culture where a UBI scheme may work in the short run.  Yet on the other side, having a nation like France or even the United States where large portions of the population have lived off of welfare for generations, a promise of free money will not change the landscape of increasing the incentive to both work and receive extra income, but instead simply replace one form of welfare with another.

The ultimate goal of the Universal Basic Income system is to try to get everyone reliant upon the government, and their money stored in the banks where at a later time the ultimate agenda of a cashless society can be instituted.  But to do this it may take a financial crisis of epic proportion to achieve this, and that may be coming much sooner than people could imagine.

Sunday, January 1, 2017

India's next step in war on cash is confiscation of physical assets like gold, silver, and real estate

In December India's Prime Minister implemented a new program to both eliminate high currency denominations, and to go after consumers who use cash outside their banking system.  This of course led to financial turmoil in a nation that conducts 98% of of its transactions in cash, and where less than 36% of the population has a bank account.

In response to the banning of certain denominations of currency, many Indians rushed into exchanging their cash for physical assets such as gold, jewelry, and even silver, and according to India's Finance Minister on Dec. 30, this is the next thing the government will go after now that physical Rupees have been limited in their economy.

As the government takes stock of the black money post demonetisation, its mulling the next step now. The focus is set to be on tracking down 'black wealth' or the illegal money pumped in real estate, gold and silver. 
Minister of State for Finance Santosh Gangwar while speaking to India Today disclosed that noose will tighten around tax evasion routes in physical assets. 
"We are doing crackdown on banks as we are getting information. Black money has a face, people can pump it in real estate, buy gold or silver. We will be stopping it," Gangwar said. 
Already, the government has amended the benami property act to detect the money laundering the real estate. Benami Transaction (Prohitibion) Amendment Act 2016 that came into effect on November 1. It aims at checking illegal money parked by tax evaders in property that is registered under multiple owners. 
"When PM was campaigning for Lok Sabha he had black money on the agenda, that's what he has delivered now and we will take it further," the minister added. 
Currently PAN card is required for selling gold, silver and jewellery over Rs 2 lakh. Since demonetisation, I-T sleuths have been keeping a hawk eye vigil at jewellers and bullion traders to track fake 'gold sale' for routing denotified currency. - India Today
The Indian government labels 'black wealth' as any asset or transaction that is done outside the banking system, and outside the government's ability to track and tax the exchange.

India won't be the only country in the coming days to usher in severe capital controls that restrict the ownership of cash and gold, or allow individuals to transact outside the nation's financial system, as just last week the EU began construction of new restrictions regarding the purchase of assets like gold from outside the Eurozone.

As the world rushes headlong into new currency, debt, and insolvency crises, governments will continue to crack down on the people's ability to choose whether they want to function in their collapsing systems.  And with so many options available now such as Bitcoin, Paypal, Goldmoney, Karatbars, etc... to both store your wealth and transact outside of banks, the coming year may see an even greater acceleration of capital controls by government's as they strive to protect their own dying platforms at the expense of the people and their money.

Tuesday, December 27, 2016

Europe now joins the war on gold as they propose confiscation from anyone entering the EU who 'might' be a terrorist

First it was India, who began the war on cash and gold by using the spurious reasons of trying to halt black market transactions.  Then they were followed next by China, who has put in place laws to limit the taking out of gold from the mainland to protect against capital flight.

Now the European Union is getting into the mix as they are proposing new laws which would allow for the confiscation of both cash and gold from anyone entering into the EU whom they deem to be a 'terrorist'.

Image result for gold confiscation
The European Commission is proposing a tightening of controls over cash and precious metals transfers from outside the EU under the guise of shutting down one route for funding of militant attacks on the continent, following the Berlin Christmas attack. 
China has already begun de facto gold import restrictions, and as Jayant Bhandari detailed previously, India is experiencing a continuation of new social engineering notifications, each sabotaging wealth-creation, confiscating people’s wealth, and tyrannizing those who refuse to be a part of the herd, in the process destroying the very backbone of the economy and civilization. There are clear signs that in a very convoluted way, possession of gold for investment purposes will be made illegal. Expect capital controls to follow. 
These new proposals are part of an EU "action plan against terrorist financing" unveiled after the bombings and shootings in Paris in November 2015.
Under the new proposals, customs officials in European Union states can step up checks on cash and prepaid payment cards sent by post or in freight shipments. 
Authorities will also be able to seize cash or precious metals carried by suspect individuals entering the EU. 
People carrying more than 10,000 euros (8,413.56 pounds) in cash already have to declare this at customs when entering the EU. The new rules would allow authorities to seize money below that threshold "where there are suspicions of criminal activity," the EU executive commission said in a note. 
The plan complements Commission proposals after the Paris attacks to tighten controls on virtual currencies such as bitcoin, and prepaid cards, which French authorities said were used to fund the bombings. 
EU states backed these proposals on Tuesday. Under the deal, which still needs European Parliament approval, holders of prepaid cards would have to show some form of identity when they make payments of 150 euros or more. 
But it gets better... 
The Commission is also proposing common rules for the 28 EU countries on freezing "terrorists' financial resources" and on confiscating assets even from those thought to be connected to criminals. - Zerohedge
The real reasons behind the sudden shift from the EU to restrict money coming into the Eurozone with either cash or gold is because they want to ween people off of using physical money, and/or protecting themselves by keeping their wealth outside the banking system.  Because all one has to do is look at recent history where European banks are not only taking part in helping to launder money for the drug cartels and terrorists, but the government's themselves know about these activities and do nothing to stop it.

Saturday, December 17, 2016

India's war on cash and gold through capital controls not as simple is it seems for the future of their economy

Many in the alternative media, including this author, have seen the outrage engendered by the Indian people over Prime Minister Modi's intrusive measures of capital controls where he has virtually declared war on both cash and gold.  And without a doubt, the attempts by Modi to wean the people off their long-standing traditions of a purely cash economy were done with little planning or thought of the consequences they would trigger.

But when you look below the surface you will find that this policy, albeit through a slower and more methodical way, may actually be necessary if not vital to the future of India as it attempts to grow its economy into an international power.

Since 98% of India's commerce is currently done using only cash, it is virtually impossible to determine the true amount of capital that would be available for the country to expand in both growth and investment since the majority of the nation's wealth resides outside their financial system.  And this has been one of the reasons why India has acted primarily as the world's labor pool rather than as a true economic power.

Yet despite their large GDP which ranks them number seven in the world, they still remain behind economies such as China, the EU, the U.S., Hong Kong, and even Russia in growth potential.

Make in India

Earlier this year Prime Minister Modi created a program to try to entice business creation and expansion into India, using their relatively well educated and vast labor pool as the sweetner.  And this move was to try to end a long-standing trend where most of the best and brightest inevitably left India for better opportunities in Europe, Asia, and the U.S..

However, Modi's Make in India program has accomplished only minimal results at best, and in part this has been due to their antiquated financial system, and the fact that most workers expect to be paid in cash rather than through a formal banking mechanism.

Image result for make in india
The Indian economy is at a critical inflection point in its modern history. India’s GDP growth has accelerated to become the fastest of all major economies in the world, with income levels today at China’s c.10 years ago, it is expected that India is now the next big story. Given its favorable demographics and other resources, India has the inherent drivers to sustain 7-8% growth over the medium to long term and the potential to achieve 10%. 
An India that can sustainably harness its core assets and create new ones has the potential to emerge as one of the key drivers of growth and stability in a world faced with increasing global economic and geopolitical uncertainty. In order to attain this position, however, India will need to do what China has historically excelled at, creating significant population-wide savings and channeling these into (reasonably) efficient assets to deliver competitive returns. Doing this requires a robust financial machine ready to finance the nation’s growth. 
Despite the significant growth and evolution of its financial services industry, India’s financial sector continues to be hamstrung by major structural inefficiencies, including an old fashioned state-dominated banking system and, despite increasingly aggressive changes, a lack of financial inclusion for large parts of the population. It is a sector in need of a new vision as the basis of a restructuring so it can play its part in India’s new growth story. 
Recent years have seen a concerted effort by both the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) and the Modi-led government to rapidly grow financial inclusion and bring more and more of India’s poor into the formal banking system. The country’s technology sector has also made a significant contribution by developing delivery systems that reduce transaction costs and spread access by leveraging growing smartphone penetration. 
However, as various factors including the large pile-up of stressed assets in the banking system, the sharp slowdown in industrial credit growth and other measures of inefficiency of the financial system indicate, India still faces significant challenges in creating an effective financial system if it is to stride more aggressively towards its potential. 
While addressing these challenges will undoubtedly be a painful process and require the expenditure of political capital, the prize is significant: potential incremental growth of 2-3% p.a. would set India’s growth on the path to achieve the double digit levels necessary to replicate China’s economic miracle. - Great Pacific Capital
India is hamstrung by the fact that they are a nation steeped deeply in tradition, and it takes decades if not centuries for serious changes to occur.  And this is why Modi's recent move to ban certain denominations of the Rupee in a very short amount of time has resulted in the population rebelling against the policy, and entrenching their distrust in banks to even greater levels.

It is a difficult act to change the confidence of a people in an institution when their natural reaction is to go on the defensive, especially when that policy is instigated from a government that has a history of corruption.  Yet if India is ever going to move ahead and reach their full potential in the global economic system, then both the people and the government will have to find some way to compromise, otherwise India will remain simply a labor pool for the world's other economic powers, and continue to be considered only a second world economy which helps grow the overall wealth of everyone else.