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Showing posts with label gold markets. Show all posts
Showing posts with label gold markets. Show all posts

Thursday, December 15, 2016

Following the Fed rate hike and spike in the dollar, the gold price spread between London and China soars to $50

Gold prices were once again beaten down in the United States following the Federal Reserves decision on Dec. 14 to raise rates by .25 bps in only the second move by the central bank in the last decade.  And while gold was sold off on Wednesday as well as early Thursday morning in New York, markets in Shanghai have not followed the same path as those in London and the Comex.

In fact with the London AM Fix coming out just a few hours ago, the price spread between the physical and paper markets have now spiked to a record $50 difference.

Shanghai Price Fix


London Price Fix


As mentioned earlier this week in another article, the divergence in official prices are also being expanded by record amounts of premiums placed upon gold by the market makers in China.  In fact, according to analyst and statistician Dr. Jim Willie, the premiums necessary to purchase large quantities of gold have forced prices right now to exceed $2000 per ounce in the physical markets.

As the dollar continues to strengthen the price of gold in nearly all other currencies and markets will continue to rise, and in some cases break through record levels.  And what we are seeing right now in the price of gold out of both London and the Comex is not indicative of the record demand being created all across the world which is the primary basis between the spreads in price we are seeing between the London fix and the one coming out of Shanghai.

Tuesday, December 13, 2016

Gold spread between London and Shanghai now $36 as premiums in India and China reach 50% over price

The gold price spread between the London paper markets and the Shanghai physical markets continues to climb as the divergence between China's PM fix and London's AM fix reached $36 on Dec. 13.

Shanghai Gold Fix

London Gold Fix

Yet these prices are not truly indicative of what is really going on in the physical markets since the bullion banks crushed down the spot price following the election of Donald Trump back on Nov. 8.  This is because geo-political and economic events in both India and China have caused demand to surge immensely over the past month, and dealers and jewelers in both countries are incorporating premiums sometimes as high as 50% over the designated price.

Last week saw news of reported gold import curbs in China (and looming capital controls) has sent gold premiums in China near three-year highs amid limited supply of the precious metal (as Reuters reports)... 
The import curbs may be part of China's efforts to limit outflows of the yuan after the currency's slide to its weakest in more than eight years, traders say. China allows only 15 banks to import gold, including three foreign lenders. 
"There is severe restriction on the banks' quota to import gold into China. Each one of them have to justify their need," a Hong Kong-based banker said. 
Gold was sold in China at about $24 an ounce above the international spot benchmark this week. Premiums went as high as $30 last week, the most since January 2014, according to Thomson Reuters data. - Zerohedge
Over in India the shortages and demand are much more extreme, with premiums skyrocketing as government officials threaten consumers and dealers with cuts to imports, and even outright confiscation.
In November the country's gold imports jumped to around 100 tonnes, the highest in 11 months. 
Jewellers and bullion dealers are deferring purchases and gold imports in December could fall to 30 tonnes, down from 107 tones in the same month a year ago, said a Mumbai-based dealer. 
It is estimated that one-third of India's annual demand of around 800 tonnes is paid for in "black money" - the local term for untaxed funds held in cash by citizens that do not appear in any official accounts. 
And this has sparked a surge in physical demand (amid limited supply concerns)... (as Reuters reports) 
There have also been reports of people rushing to buy gold by paying as much as a 50 percent premium above official prices using their unaccounted money to skirt the note ban.

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

With Shanghai now establishing a new price discovery, Russia wants to join with China to create joint Eurasian gold market

April 19 was a monumental day for the global physical gold markets, with the Shanghai Gold Exchange (SGE) setting a new price to compete directly with London and the U.S. Comex.  Yet this move is just the first of many in China's long-term strategy to bring about a worldwide return to a gold standard.

And now it appears that they won't go it alone as on the same day of China's gold price determination for the world's largest gold market, Russia wants to join in as their central bank is now in talks with Beijing to create a joint Eurasian market that will be almost bigger than the Western metals markets combined.


The Bank of Russia and the People's Bank of China want to create a joint platform that would unite gold trading by the world's two biggest gold buying countries.
“BRICS countries are large economies with large reserves of gold and an impressive volume of production and consumption of this precious metal. In China, the gold trade is conducted in Shanghai, in Russia it is in Moscow. Our idea is to create a link between the two cities in order to increase trade between the two markets," First Deputy Governor of the Russian Central Bank Sergey Shvetsov told TASS. 
China is the world's largest gold producer. Last year it produced 490 tons. Russia is third after Australia with about 295 tons produced last year. Overall, the countries make up 25 percent of the world gold production. 
At the same time, the central banks of Russia and China are the world’s biggest gold buyers. Since the end of 2008 the gold reserves of China have nearly tripled - from 600 to 1,762 tons. 
Among the countries with the largest gold reserves, China is fifth and Russia is sixth after the US, Germany, Italy and France. - Russia Today

Outside of 'official' gold reserve tally's, it is estimated by insiders that both China and Russia own more than 40,000 tons combined, which would be greater than all reported reserves held in Western central banks.