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Showing posts with label eliminate cash. Show all posts
Showing posts with label eliminate cash. Show all posts

Saturday, April 22, 2017

Fear of bank runs and insolvency behind IMF's newest proposal for elimination of cash

While both the Fed and the mainstream media will never tell the truth on how solvent or insolvent a bank is right up to the day when they go under or collapse, the IMF a few weeks ago issued a new report pushing for the elimination of cash as the means to keep account holders from taking their money out of domestic and global institutions.

The fear of bank runs and all out bank insolvencies are what are at the heart of the IMF's push to eliminate physical cash and bring all economies under the dominion of a digital system according to the former head of Germany's Federal Association of German Industry in an interview he participated in on April 21.

Image result for the move to eliminate cash is to stop bank runs
In its recent report, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) proposed to abolish cash and recommended to adopt measures in order to restrict its use. In an interview with Sputnik Germany, former head of the Federal Association of German Industry (BDI) Hans-Olaf Henkel said that this "could lead to terrible consequences." 
Henkel believes that one of the main reasons behind this proposal is the desire of financial institutions to force people to keep their money in banks. 
"The European Central Bank (ECB) does not want that depositors to keep their money under the pillow. If any bank in Europe goes bankrupt, then depositors have a guaranteed right that the state will return them the amount of up to 100,000 euros. But not more," the economist told Sputnik Germany. 
So, if a bank goes bankrupt, people who have savings of over 100,000 euros will remain with nothing. Thus, many keep their cash not in banks, Henkel argued. - Sputnik News

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

South Korea is the newest country seeking to eliminate cash and wants to do so by 2020

First it was Sweden, who's people are so intoxicated by technology that it was not very difficult to get them to give up their cash to run on an entirely electronic financial system.  Then in November India decided to jump on the Cashless Society bandwagon, only unlike their counterparts living in the Northern part of Europe, their citizens are the exact opposite and do not trust their government or banking system to take away physical cash from the economy.

Thus when it comes to creating a world without physical money it is on par with how half the world is content to be as sheep and follow the globalists desire to control every aspect of their spending, saving, and investing, while the other half is infused with the frequency of Populism, and realize that without the ability to control your own money in a physical form, then nearly all freedoms are permanently lost to the whims of elected and un-elected officials.


As we are now well into the first quarter of 2017, and living in the aftermath of Brexit and the election of Donald Trump, the battle is on for the establishment to hold onto the status quo, while at the same time fighting a populist movement that seeks to tear down their power base built upon a foundation of debt, credit, and privately owned central banks.  And at the fore are two more major economies push strongly towards a cashless monetary system.

And those two entities are the European Union, and South Korea.
“Hand over your money.” That’s what the Financial Times newspaper called it. But it might as well be rephrased as “Stick ’em up!”

It appears that the Central Bank of Korea, South Korea’s central bank, plans to withdraw all coins by 2020, followed by removing all bank notes soon afterwards. No feedback has been requested from the public.

South Korea is determined to become a cashless society, exclusively using T-Money and other electronic payment cards. This goal may make sense to South Korea’s banks and government, but it is not without obstacles or resistance. - Numismaster
The ball is already rolling down the path towards a completely cashless society, where physical money is eliminated and your freedom to choose to spend, save, and invest as you see fit is at stake.  Which means that the clock is now ticking for anyone who is awake to transition their wealth out of this parasitic system before it is too late, and find alternatives in hard assets that act as money (gold, silver), or in a financial construct such as Bitcoin and Goldmoney, that allow you to keep your wealth in a structure that is outside the control of banks and government.

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

The threat of the U.S. banning cash is not over as it becomes a topic at the Davos Economic Forum

Just when Americans thought they might be out of the woods from their government seeking to ban cash, a Nobel-Laureate economist participating at this year's Davos World Economic Forum has proven that to be incorrect.  In fact, the topic of banning cash in the U.S. as well as elsewhere around the world is on the menu of this week's forum, and Joseph Stiglitz is the chef serving that main course.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has already removed 86% of his country's currency from circulation in an attempt to curb tax evasion, tackle corruption and shut down the shadow economy.
Should the US follow suit? 
Joseph Stiglitz, Nobel Prize-winning economist, thinks so. Phasing out currency and moving towards a digital economy would, over the long term, have “benefits that outweigh the cost,” the Columbia University professor said on day one of the World Economic Forum's Annual Meeting in Davos. 
Stiglitz was speaking in the session Ending Corruption alongside Mark Pieth from the Basel Institute of Governance and APCO Worldwide Founder and Executive Chairman Margery Kraus. Stiglitz and Pieth co-authored a report, Overcoming the Shadow Economy, in November last year. 
Quantifying the scale of the problem, Stiglitz said: “You can put it into the context of one of the big issues being discussed in Davos this year - the backlash against globalization, the darker side of globalization ... The lack of transparency in global financial markets, the secrecy havens that the Panama Papers exposed, just reinforced what we already knew ... There is a global framework for both corruption and tax evasion and tax avoidance. 
“The fact that you can hide ill-gotten gains so easily in these secrecy havens really provides incentives for people to engage in this activity as they can get the economic returns and then enjoy the benefits of those returns. If there were not these secrecy havens then the benefits from engaging in these kinds of illicit activity would be much diminished.” 
One of the countries that has not done enough to fight corruption is the US, Stiglitz went on to say, and one remedy could be to phase out cash and embrace digital currencies. - World Economic Forum
Stiglitz, like two other economists (Larry Summers and Ken Rogoff) who spent 2016 promoting the end of cash to protect the failures of the central banks, sees taking away the freedoms that physical money provides all individuals as the only alternative to allow the Fed to begin negative interest rates.  However, like with nearly all Keynesian economists running Western monetary systems today, they ignore the real culprits behind the use of cash in illegal activities, and refuse to call out the very banks they wish to protect from when they were tightly involved in money laundering, and helping fund terrorism and the drug war.

As we have seen in India, the European Union, and Venezuela these past few months, governments are not afraid to eliminate currencies or formulate policies meant to ban cash entirely from an economy.  And this leaves the only recourse for the common man to simply opt out of the system, and get their wealth into physical gold, silver, or bitcoin, and offshore as much of it as possible so that it is outside the hands of the financiers who want to take it from you.

Saturday, January 7, 2017

War on cash in Greece, Australia, India, China, and Venezuela opening door for need to have gold and Bitcoin

2016 was the year where economic 'experts' dropped hints in newspaper op-ed's and university white papers on how governments needed to eliminate cash to sustain the debt bubbles central banks had created through their absurd monetary policies following the 2008 financial crisis.  And while many individuals pushed off the idea of banning physical cash as hyperbole and 'ivory tower' nonsense, by the end of the year at least three countries had begun testing this option, with two more implementing capital controls to achieve the same thing here in early 2017.

Image result for war on cash

In late November, India's Prime Minister Modi issued a sudden mandate where the largest two denominations of currency were being completely absolved, and that the people had until December 15 to turn in their bank notes for new script.  This led to an economic revolt where most people tried to exchange their money for gold or gold jewelry, shooting up the price in some cases to around $3600 per ounce.

This move in India was soon followed by the country of Venezuela, where President Maduro called for the elimination of the $100 Bolivar note to try to keep the Venezuelan people from using their near worthless money to buy food and other goods from neighboring Columbia.

Yet the questions one has to ask are, were these moves independent of one another, or were these nations being used as test cases to see how the public would react to restrictions on owning and using cash?

If we put these inquiries on the back shelf for the moment to look at two other nations instituting restrictions on cash through differing forms of capital controls, the most important focus should be on the reactions of the people to their governments restricting their ability to do as they please with their money, and in what assets they are moving into to escape those restrictions.

That answer of course is the movement of wealth into both gold and Bitcoin.

Image result for gold and bitcoin

In the case of India, people looked towards their long-standing tradition of physical gold, and helped created shortages as they lost nearly all confidence in their fiat money itself.  But over in China, where the government instituted capital controls restricting the offshoring of money in an attempt to counteract growing liquidity problems in their banking system, investors and individuals looked to Bitcoin as the quickest and most liquid way of transferring their Yuan into some other currency or asset outside their borders.

Heading into the second week of the new year, two additional countries are preparing to join in the war on cash and put their own peoples to the test on whether they will accept the elimination of cash, or if they will rebel en masse to this loss of economic freedom.  And for both Greeks and Australians, the coming days will see what their reactions will be and if they too will seek solace in alternative forms of money, or if they will simply accept the inevitable and quietly cede their personal sovereignty to function under a digital system run at the political whims of their governments.

Friday, December 9, 2016

Why gold and Bitcoin are freedom: EU's new plans to eliminate cash are not about convenience, but about control and tax confiscation

As countries as diverse as India, Sweden, Denmark, and Spain begin to work towards the banning of physical cash and instituting a completely digital monetary system, one entity is seeking to trump them all by formulating a program that would not only eliminate cash and atm machines, but would entirely change banking as we know if for all of Europe.

And if their goals are reached, it could become the new standard across the Eurozone as early as late 2017.

Image result for europe seeks cashless society
The European Payments Council (EPC), a subdivision of the European Central Bank, are taking steps in their quest to fully eliminate all cash. The reason is not to lift the burden off retailers or to make transactions more convenient but in reality to raise desperately needed taxes. 
Highly respected ‘ArmstrongEconomics‘ reports that the EPC are going full steam ahead to enable immediate payment systems throughout not just the Eurozone but the entire European Union. The Single European Payments Area (SEPA) has been devised with the ultimate goal of eliminating ATM cash machines and force everyone to use their mobile phones or plastic cards, the project starting as early as November 2017. 
In the absence of confirmed information on this point, it is likely that tourists and business people will be forced to pre-pay Euro’s onto an App if they come from a country outside the eurozone, currently made up of Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Spain. 
The final goal of the EU Commission is best described in their own words: “The Single Euro Payments Area (or “SEPA” for short) is where more than 500 million citizens, over 20 million businesses and European public authorities can make and receive payments in euro. SEPA also means better banking services for all: transparent pricing, valuable guarantees ensuring that your payments are received promptly and in full, and banks assuming responsibility if something goes wrong with your payment.” 
This year, meetings and conferences called “Towards a cashless society” were started to get the information transfer across to the infrastructure, supported very heavily by the banks. 
It looks as though the initial battleground for banning cash will be … Greece. - Global Research
Perhaps it is not a coincidence now that earlier this week European Central Bank head Mario Draghi announced that their QE program would be extended until December of 2017, just one month after the EPC hopes to have Europe completely in a cashless society.

The majority of people in the West already function in an environment without cash as online banking, and the use of debt or credit cards, outweighs the number of transactions taking place using physical currency.  However, underlying this trust is the fact that for now, if someone desired to take out their wealth stored in a bank they could do do and have it distributed to them in physical cash notes.

All along the war on cash that has emerged in 2016 has never been about stopping drug cartels, black markets, or the myriad of other excuses those in power have used to justify the banning of physical money.  No, the real reasons stem from the fact that nearly all monetary systems in the West run on a leveraged system where there are upwards of 100 times more money created in digital form than there is actual cash available, and any strong run on the banks could collapse the entire financial system.

Additionally, eight years of failed central bank policies have driven the Western monetary system to the brink of another collapse, and it is forcing these institutions as well as governments to seek never before heard of measures such as negative interest rates, and beyond 100% debt to GDP.

The truth of the matter is that the desire to institute a cashless society is not for the benefit of the 7 billion members who inhabit planet earth, but for the .001% of the 1% who want to use a cashless society to have utter control over money, and everyone's use of it.  And it is why the need to store your wealth in some other vehicle than cash or in a bank is vital, and this means an alternative form of wealth protection such as gold, silver, and bitcoin which banks, nor governments, can readily steal.

Monday, May 18, 2015

German economists jump on the ‘end of cash’ bandwagon

They say that when something occurs a single time it is a coincidence. Then if it happens a second time it is a pattern.  But if the same event or philosophy occurs, or is promoted by numerous sources and from several different locations, then that thing has expanded fully into a trend.
The war against cash, and in particular, the call to end the use of cash, has now emerged into a full fledged trend, and one that appears to be propagated by the very banking system that was originally built to service the use of cash, money, and legal tender.  The question of course to ask is why would financial institutions, a university professor, and now, a think tank economist all call for an end of the use of physical cash?
The answer lies in a conclusion none in the financial system want to accept, with their response instead to seek a solution that would impose draconian restrictions on the freedoms of all people in their right to choose how they spend or save their money.
 
Read more on this article here...