The Israel Deception

Is the return of Israel in the 20th century truly a work of God, or is it a result of a cosmic chess move to deceive the elect by the adversary?

Showing posts with label cities. Show all posts
Showing posts with label cities. Show all posts

Friday, September 4, 2015

The economy is so great that the common man can’t afford to live in his own city anymore

As the stock market today continues to show breakdowns all across Wall Street, Main Street has been in a continuous decline since the Credit Crash of 2008.  And although the fake unemployment numbers that are reported by the government are painted to be around 5.3%, the sad reality in this new waiter vs. manufacturing ‘recovery’ is that thanks to inflated prices in the housing and rental markets, the average American can no longer afford to live in even the most inexpensive of cities.
Low-income workers and their families do not earn enough to live in even the least expensive metropolitan American communities, according to a new analysis of families’ living costs published Wednesday.
The analysis, released by the left-leaning Economic Policy Institute, is an annual update of the think tank’s Family Budget Calculator that reflects new 2014 data. The Family Budget Calculator is a formula designed to determine the income “required for families to attain a secure yet modest standard of living” in 618 different communities across the country that the U.S. Census Bureau defines as metropolitan areas. The formula uses data collected by the government and some nonprofit groups to measure costs of housing, food, child care, transportation, health care, “other necessities” like clothing, and taxes for families of 10 different compositions in these specific locales. - Huffington Post



Read more on this article here... 

Friday, March 23, 2012

CIties defaults could accelerate as Municipal Bonds stand on edge of collapse

On March 22nd, the End of the American Dream blog came out with 10 indicators that cities around the country could begin defaulting in greater numbers as both the pension funds and municipal bonds outstanding could be on the verge of a collapse.



Chart courtesy of the Wall Street Journal

#1 Moody's has downgraded Detroit's debt again.
#2 The city of Indianapolis is facing an unprecedented 75 million dollar budget deficit in 2012. City officials are warning that there may soon not be enough money to keep the streetlights on.

#3 Suffolk County in New York has declared a "fiscal emergency" after discovering that it is projected to take on a total of more than 500 million dollars of additional debt by the end of 2013.

#4 The city of Trenton, New Jersey is so broke that it has put off buying more toilet paper for city buildings. At last report, there were a total of 15 rolls remaining and after that those that use city restrooms will be on their own.

#5 Some cities are slashing expenses dramatically in an attempt to stay afloat.

#6 In New York, state officials are deeply concerned that city and local governments are paying their pension obligations by borrowing from the state pension fund. This is essentially like making your minimum monthly payment on a credit card by borrowing more money on that same credit card....

#7 Pension problems are catching up with a lot of cities all over the nation. For example, CBS News reported recently that the city of Central Falls, Rh0de Island has been forced to declare bankruptcy because of pension woes....

#8 Last November, Jefferson County, Alabama filed for the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history. At the time, they had accumulated a total of approximately 4.2 billion dollars of debt.

#9 Several other U.S. large cities have defaulted on their debts in early 2012

#10 In all, there have been 21 municipal defaults so far in 2012. The grand total of those defaults comes to 978 million dollars.


On top this these indicators listed, interest rates appear ready to move up outside the Fed's influence to control the lending rates.  Rates crossed 4% for the first time in several months in March, and the rate of foreclosures is now increasing after legal and legislative changes were made to the contract ownership barriers between banks and homeowners.

Lower tax receipts, coupled with rising inflation and the inability of cities to borrow money through bond auctions will accelaerate the collapse of many municipalities, and lead to greater unrest as city pension funds continue to shrink for retirees.

Friday, January 27, 2012

Even in recovery there are 216 economic dead zone around the US

As economic recovery moves slowly and gradually in many cities and areas around the US, a new study by Louis Ferleger of Alter Net lays out 216 economic dead zones that have not been a part of this emergence, and are in fact moving further away from recovery.

There are 216 defined metropolitan (metro) and micropolitan (micro) areas—with populations ranging from 10,000 to 4 million—that have had unemployment rates at least two percentage points higher than the national average for either 20, 10, or 5 years (see tables 1, 2, 3 at the end of this article). These are America’s dead zones. Here employment growth is stagnant or non-existent and high levels of joblessness dominate. Some areas were once prosperous while others have recently experienced economic distress. In these communities paid work is hard to find for those who have not given up looking, and widespread involuntary idleness is the norm. - Alternet

Here is a list of these cities and dead zones courtesy of Alternet.org





America has a history of cities and areas rising and falling for one reason or another.  The gold and silver rushes of the 19th century hold a plethora of ghost towns that were at one time some of the richest municipalities in the country.  Today, the city of Detroit is becoming one with the loss of so much industry, automobile manufacturing, and a brain drain out of the city and state.