Saturday, April 1, 2017

Pension bomb climbs to nearly $2 trillion in a decade as Fed and zero interest rates kill Americans chance of retirement

With the Federal Reserve picking winners in their monetary policies since the 2008 financial crisis, the real losers have been the 10's of million of retirees, and the hundreds of millions of Americans who have lost purchasing power thanks to stagnant wages and rising inflation.  And it is directly on the heads of the central bank that the wealth disparity between the 1% and everyone else has taken place.

And because of the massive expansion of credit and debt, and the keeping of interest rates below 1% for over a decade, the nuclear bomb that is America's underfunded retirement scheme is now on the precipice of not only exploding, but also taking down local and state governments with it.

Just how big is the underfunded pension bomb you might ask?  Numbers as of the end of March 2017 now show that the total is just under $2 trillion, and has gone up nearly 10 times since 2007 and just before the financial crash.

Image result for pension bomb
Are millions of Americans about to see the big, juicy pensions that they were counting on to fund their golden years go up in flames in the biggest financial disaster in U.S. history? When Bloomberg published an editorial entitled “Pension Crisis Too Big for Markets to Ignore“, it simply confirmed what a lot of people already knew to be true.  Pension funds all over America are woefully underfunded, and they have been pouring mind boggling amounts of money into very risky investments such as Internet stocks and commercial mortgages.  Just like with subprime mortgages in 2008, this is a crisis that everyone can see coming well in advance, and yet nothing is being done about it. 
On a day to day basis, Americans generally don’t think very much about pensions.  Most of those that have been promised pensions simply have faith that they will be there when they need them. 
Unfortunately, the truth is that pension plans all over the country are severely underfunded, and this has already resulted in local fiascos such as the one that we just witnessed in Dallas
But what happened in Dallas is just the very small tip of a very large iceberg.  According to Bloomberg, unfunded pension obligations on a national basis “have risen to $1.9 trillion from $292 billion since 2007″… 
As was the case with the subprime crisis, the writing appears to be on the wall. And yet calamity has yet to strike. How so? Call it the triumvirate of conspirators – the actuaries, accountants and their accomplices in office. Throw in the law of big numbers, very big numbers, and you get to a disaster in a seemingly permanent state of making. Unfunded pension obligations have risen to $1.9 trillion from $292 billion since 2007. 
And of course that $1.9 trillion number is not actually the real number. 
That same Bloomberg article goes on to admit that if honest math was being used that the real number would actually be closer to 6 trillion dollars… 
So why not just flip the switch and require truth and honesty in public pension math? Too many cities and potentially states would buckle under the weight of more realistic assumed rates of return. By some estimates, unfunded liabilities would triple to upwards of $6 trillion if the prevailing yields on Treasuries were used. That would translate into much steeper funding requirements at a time when budgets are already severely constrained. Pockets of the country would face essential public service budgets being slashed to dangerous levels. -  The Economic Collapse

0 comments:

Post a Comment