Sunday, February 26, 2017

State of Idaho joins Utah and Arizona in forging legislation to recognize gold and silver as money

Earlier this year, the states of Utah and Arizona both proposed legislation to eliminate state taxes on the buying and selling of gold and silver in a first step initiative to have them once again recognized as money and legal tender.  Now on Feb. 24 we can add the state of Idaho to the mix as the growing trend towards returning to sound money is starting to pick of steam.

A bill introduced in the Idaho House would eliminate state capital gains taxes on gold and silver specie, and encourage its use as currency. Final approval of the legislation would help undermine the Federal Reserve’s monopoly on money. 
House Majority Leader Mike Moyle introduced House Bill 206 (H206) on Feb. 23. The legislation would amend Idaho revenue statutes, providing “that capital gains and losses on precious metals bullion and monetized bullion sales be added to or subtracted from Idaho taxable income.” 
The Framers of our nation established that gold and silver are money, but federal taxing authorities in recent decades have required taxpayers to pay taxes on this form of money when its exchange for Federal Reserve Notes results in nominal capital “gains.” 
Similar to a bill recently passed by Arizona’s state House, Idaho H206 is a pure and tax neutral proposal. That’s because both precious metals gains (income) and losses are backed out of the calculation of one’s Idaho taxable income.   While HB206’s passage will have little fiscal impact as to Idaho tax revenues, it will have a larger impact on Idahoans’ freedoms. 
Enjoying the backing of the Sound Money Defense League, the Idaho Freedom Foundation, and Money Metals Exchange (an Idaho-based national precious metals dealer), the Idaho proposal seeks to correct the misclassification of precious metals by the IRS as “property” rather than money.  It is only because of this misclassification in the first place that precious metals income and losses are included in the federal adjusted gross income number that flows through to the taxpayer’s Idaho tax return. - Tenth Amendment Center

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