Sunday, February 19, 2017

Is Germany's gold repatriation in preparation for end of Euro as Chancellor Merkel questions solvency of the currency

Sometimes events that coincide with certain actions taken are little more than coincidental, or at most unforeseen consequences of those changes to the norm.  But for the most part in the political sphere, when actions are taken they are done with a purposeful agenda in mind, as validated by a quote made 80 years ago by then President Franklin Roosevelt.

“In politics, nothing happens by accident. If it happens, you can bet it was planned that way.”
Now with this in mind there were two key activities and comments that took place in Germany over the last seven days which can easily lead to a conclusion that the largest economy in the Eurozone is expecting a mighty sea change to Europe's current monetary system.

Germany has finally received half of the gold they initiated repatriation of

Over the past 10 days Germany finally received a large portion of the gold they demanded be returned from both the New York Fed, and from banks throughout Europe that have held their gold since the end of World War II.  And in an op-ed from CNBC a few days ago, the question as to why they wanted or needed this gold was asked.

An official announcement last week that the Bundesbank had pretty much repatriated half its gold reserves ahead of schedule has once again sent the rumor mill into overdrive. 
And the talk has now stepped up a notch with the Bundesbank confirming Thursday that it has already moved 583 tons of gold out of New York and Paris. Its plan to hold half its gold in Frankfurt is now three years ahead of schedule. 
Reporting the news, Reuters said that some argue the world's second-biggest bullion reserve "may be needed to back a new deutsche mark, should the euro zone break up." This seems pretty far-fetched, especially given that the Bretton Woods system of fixed exchange rates ended back in the 1970s. Could Berlin really be prepping for the fall of the euro? - CNBC
Yet speculation in the business media is not enough to validate why Germany is choosing to focus on their gold repatriation now after saying three years ago that it was no longer a concern.  That is until we look at comments made by Chancellor Angela Merkel on Feb. 18 where she finally admitted that there are serious problems with the Euro, and even went as far to blame Mario Draghi and his monetary policies done through the European Central Bank.
Two weeks ago, German finance minister Wolfgang Schauble confirmed Donald Trump's charge that the Euro is far "too low" for Germany, but said he is unable to do anything about it and instead blamed Mario Draghi. “The euro exchange rate is, strictly speaking, too low for the German economy’s competitive position,” he told Tagesspiegel on February 5. “When ECB chief Mario Draghi embarked on the expansive monetary policy, I told him he would drive up Germany’s export surplus . . . I promised then not to publicly criticise this [policy] course. But then I don’t want to be criticized for the consequences of this policy.” 
Then, on Saturday, his boss German Chancellor Angela Merkel echoed her finance minister, and also admitted that the euro is indeed "too low" for Germany, but once again made clear that Berlin had no power to address this "problem" because monetary policy was set by the independent European Central Bank. 
"We have at the moment in the euro zone of course a problem with the value of the euro," Merkel said in an unusual foray into foreign exchange rate policy. - Zerohedge
But the problems with the Euro currency go far beyond the ineptitude of the former Goldman Sachs banker who plays the role as Master of the Universe over Europe's monetary system.  This is because the rising tide of populism has become a real threat to the end of the Euro and even the European Union, with Italy, France, the Netherlands, and possibly even Greece all threatening to leave the currency and Union should elections pan out as currently predicted for these nation states.

Germany's biggest financial fear is inflation, and over the past several months their economy has been experiencing sharp rises in prices as debt, liquidity, and even banking problems hover like Black Swans over their, and the entire EU financial system.  And it is becoming apparent that the Germany government is taking no chances by accelerating their repatriation of their gold, because the writing appears more and more on the wall that gold will be the money of choice after the next crisis hits.

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