Monday, December 12, 2016

Venezuela follows India in eliminating large currency notes and sets in motion hyperinflation

When you are an economy that not only relies upon exports and foreign investment, messing with your currency is a recipe for disaster.  And besides the internal turmoil that has arisen for the 1.3 billion people in India who rely upon cash over digital banking for 98% of their commerce, Prime Minister Modi's currency elimination scheme is now causing foreign businesses, such as China's Foxconn, to suspend factory output and fire worker's due to decreased sales inside the country.

Foxconn, the world’s largest contract manufacturer and poster boy of the government’s Make in India project, has asked nearly a fourth of its 8,000 factory workers to go on paid leave for two weeks after last month’s demonetisation of high value notes sparked a severe cash crunch that saw sales slump almost 50%, forcing the company to slash production by half.

The government’s move to ban Rs 500 and Rs 1,000 notes from November 9 has had a domino effect on the mobile phone industry where a large majority of mobile phones are bought for less than Rs 5,000 and most of the transactions happen through cash. Consumer purchase power has been reduced dramatically – mobile phone monthly sales halved to Rs 175-200 crore post demonetisation – and sales revival is not looking up, as was perceived earlier, industry insiders said.  - Economic Times/India Times
So with the results and outcomes that sudden demonitization creates out there for the rest of the world to see, only someone like Venezuela's corrupt leader Nicholas Maduro would have the audacity to... well, DO THE SAME THING!  And sure enough, over the weekend Maduro went full retard and immediately made their $100 bolivar denomination no longer legal tender.

Image result for maduro never go full retard
Having observed the economic chaos to emerge as a result of India's shocking Nov. 8 demonetization announcement, and perhaps confident it can do better, today president Nicolas Maduro of Venezuela, Latin America's most distressed economy, mired in an economic crisis and facing hyperinflation, likewise shocked the nation when he announced on state TV that just like India, Venezuela would pull its highest denominated, 100-bolivar bill (which is worth about two U.S. cents on the black market), from circulation over the next 72 hours, ahead of the introduction of new, higher-value notes, as large as 20,000. 
"I have decided to take out of circulation bills of 100 bolivars in the next 72 hours," Maduro said. "We must keep beating the mafias." 
To this we would add "and cue economic chaos", but since this is Venezuela, that's a given. 
The surprise move, announced by Maduro during an hours-long speech, is likely to worsen a cash crunch in Venezuela, and lead the largely-cash based economy to a state of paralysis. Maduro said the 100-bolivar bill will be taken out of circulation on Wednesday and Venezuelans will have 10 days after that to exchange those notes at the central bank. 
Critics immediately slammed the move, which Maduro said was needed to combat contraband of the bills at the volatile Colombia-Venezuela border, as economically nonsensical, adding there would be no way to swap all the 100-bolivar bills in circulation in the time the president has allotted. Indeed, if India is any example, Venezuela - whose economy is far worse than that of India, the world's fastest growing emerging market - may have just signed its own economic death warrant. 
According to central bank data, in November there were more than six billion 100-bolivar bills in circulation, 48 percent of all bills and coins. In other words, Venezuela just eliminated half the paper cash in circulation. - Zerohedge
For those who live elsewhere in the world, just remember that following the 2008 financial crisis the U.S. and Europe both passed laws which make any cash you hold in a bank the property of that bank, and considered an unfunded liability to the institution.  And with central banks, Harvard economists, and even a former Asst. Secretary of the Treasury all calling for an end to cash here in America, what we are seeing now in India and Venezuela are test cases for what is currently in motion in the West to bring about a complete monetary control over the population before or after the next banking and financial crisis hits.

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