Saturday, December 3, 2016

Demand for gold in the U.S., China, and India on fire as lack of trust in currencies signal a new coming crisis

In just the past month, and especially since the Nov. 8 Presidential election, the demand for gold throughout the world has increased at a rapid pace.

We have already documented the intense scramble for gold in India over the past three weeks as Prime Minister Modi began implementing the banning of some cash, and the institution of capital controls. But even with the selling off of gold in the Western paper markets that has seen the spot price drop by more than $200 in the past four weeks, it has done nothing to effect the physical gold markets where premiums have spiked to three year highs, and where a record number of U.S. gold eagles have been sold just in November by the U.S. Mint.

u-s-mint-gold-eagle-sales-2016

Graphic courtesy of SRS Rocco Report
Investment demand for Gold Eagles surged during the last day in November pushing sales to a new monthly record.  Not only did Gold Eagle sales for November reach a new record high for the year, it surpassed sales during the same month last year by 52%. 
It seems as if investors are once again taking advantage of lower gold prices.  I had planned to publish the article on Wednesday (last day of the month) showing that November sales hit a new record high, but the U.S. Mint updated their figures yesterday reporting another 20,000 Gold Eagles oz were sold on the 30th. 
So, as of Nov 29th, the U.S. Mint Gold Eagle sales reached a new high for the year of 127,500 oz.  Then they sold another stunning 20,000 oz in one day for a total of 147,500 Gold Eagle oz for November: - SRS Rocco Report
Over in China the process to exchange dollars for gold has shifted into high gear as the country that runs the world's largest physical gold market dumped hundreds of billions of dollars worth of Treasury reserves and used them to import nearly 1,000 tons of gold in just in the last quarter.  And premiums at the Shanghai Gold Exchange have soared to well over $30 per ounce as seen by the spread enacted between the Shanghai and London AM/PM price fixes.

While paper gold traders can't seem to dump the precious metal fast enough, physical gold demand is soaring around the world. India retail premiums are spiking (amid demonetization), local China premiums soar to a 3-year-high (as capital controls loom), and coin sales from the US Mint have risen for the 4th straight month, accelerating post-election to the highest since July 2015 since Trump's victory at the election. 
Following the initial panic-buying across India after Modi's demonetization effort shook the nation's faith in fiat currency (sending local gold premiums soaring), news of reported gold import curbs in China (and looming capital controls) has sent gold premiums in China near three-year highs amid limited supply of the precious metal (as Reuters reports)... 
The import curbs may be part of China's efforts to limit outflows of the yuan after the currency's slide to its weakest in more than eight years, traders say. China allows only 15 banks to import gold, including three foreign lenders. 
"There is severe restriction on the banks' quota to import gold into China. Each one of them have to justify their need," a Hong Kong-based banker said.
Gold was sold in China at about $24 an ounce above the international spot benchmark this week. Premiums went as high as $30 last week, the most since January 2014, according to Thomson Reuters data. - Zerohedge
When a market or sovereign government manipulates the price of a commodity, security, or equity contrary to the demand of that asset, the end result is always the same... a run on those assets similar to the way a populace would rush to clean out a grocery store in the advent of a natural disaster.  And as nearly all global currencies start to be rejected by their people in lieu of this year's concerted efforts to ban or restrict the use of cash, the worldwide run on gold appears now to be in full swing, and only 1% of the global population is aware of it.

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