Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Is Putin riding on Greece to help end the sanctions against Russia from the EU?

Ever since the U.S. imposed economic sanctions on Russia in the early part of 2014, the European Union has followed Washington’s policy like a lapdog or a vassal state.  But the effects of these bi-lateral sanctions have caused immense strains between the political and economic segments of each nation within the EU, culminating in numerous protests, strikes, and even rises in new radical political parties.
However, the EU has one interesting format in which Russia could potentially exploit, and that is that every treaty, act of war, or sanction must be ratified unanimously by all member states within the Union.  And the crack by which Vladimir Putin could use to break the coalition has always been Greece.
Greece is an EU nation that has been brutally crushed by the likes of Germany, the IMF, and the oligarchs in Brussels.  And their ongoing six years of forced austerity is derived primarily from onerous loans forced upon them by banks such as Goldman Sachs, and corrupt technocrats assigned to run Greece following the 2008 financial collapse.  Thus a growing hatred of both Germany and the European Commission by the people of Greece is a door right now being used by Russia to break just one country that could stand up and reject the renewal of sanctions against them when they come up for a vote in June.


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