Tuesday, March 8, 2016

The Central bank of central banks (BIS) recommends new financial model and puts gold standard as a new alternative

In a recent presentation by the Bank of International Settlements, or as it is known to the masses the central bank of central banks, the head of the bank's Monetary and Economic Department recommended that the global economy needs to get rid of its current debt-based monetary system, and move to another that provides more stability with less inflationary and deflationary extremes.

And in presenting his proposal to other members of the BIS, one of the alternative systems that is on Claudio Borio's recommended sheet was a return to a form of the gold standard.

This presentation suggests an alternative lens through which to view the global economy's struggle to achieve sustainable and balanced growth, reflecting a failure to prevent the build-up and collapse of hugely damaging financial booms and busts. A symptom of the current malaise can be seen in interest rates that have been exceptionally low for an exceptionally long time, with a record high amount of global sovereign debt trading at negative yields. To break out of this trap, there is a need to take a longer-term view and rebalance policies towards structural measures, abandoning the debt-fuelled growth model that has brought us to the current predicament. - Claudio Borio 
And an additional commentary on this recommendation was made by Economist Jim Rickards: 
It's interesting that they included the Classical Gold Standard period in their comparisons. Why include gold as a baseline case unless there was some chance of going back to gold? 
The main point they are making is that inflation and deflation show up more in asset prices than consumer prices. While consumer price swings have been modest, asset price swings have been huge and dangerous. Asset price bubble bursts impose huge hidden costs and are dragging down productivity because of the misallocation of capital.
So, there are a lot of "hidden costs" in debt-fueled expansions. Once these costs are taken into account, periods without as much debt or asset bubbles (such as the gold standard period) look like a better growth model by comparison." - Lone Star White House


Post a Comment