Friday, January 27, 2012

Even in recovery there are 216 economic dead zone around the US

As economic recovery moves slowly and gradually in many cities and areas around the US, a new study by Louis Ferleger of Alter Net lays out 216 economic dead zones that have not been a part of this emergence, and are in fact moving further away from recovery.

There are 216 defined metropolitan (metro) and micropolitan (micro) areas—with populations ranging from 10,000 to 4 million—that have had unemployment rates at least two percentage points higher than the national average for either 20, 10, or 5 years (see tables 1, 2, 3 at the end of this article). These are America’s dead zones. Here employment growth is stagnant or non-existent and high levels of joblessness dominate. Some areas were once prosperous while others have recently experienced economic distress. In these communities paid work is hard to find for those who have not given up looking, and widespread involuntary idleness is the norm. – Alternet

Here is a list of these cities and dead zones courtesy of Alternet.org





America has a history of cities and areas rising and falling for one reason or another.  The gold and silver rushes of the 19th century hold a plethora of ghost towns that were at one time some of the richest municipalities in the country.  Today, the city of Detroit is becoming one with the loss of so much industry, automobile manufacturing, and a brain drain out of the city and state.

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