Tuesday, December 27, 2011

Anonymous Hacker Group provides explanation for data theft at Stratfor

Over the Christmas holiday, one of two primary hacker groups, in this case Anonymous, broke into the databases of global think tank Stratfor and downloaded over 200GB's worth of emails, credit and personal information, and policy links.

On December 27th, the group issued a communique as to why they targeted the think tank.

Stratfor was not breached in order to obtain customer credit card numbers, which the hackers in question could not have expected to be as easily obtainable as they were. Rather, the operation was pursued in order to obtain the 2.7 million e-mails that exist on the firm's servers. This wealth of data includes correspondence with untold thousands of contacts who have spoken to Stratfor's employees off the record over more than a decade. Many of those contacts work for major corporations within the intelligence and military contracting sectors, government agencies, and other institutions for which Anonymous and associated parties have developed an interest since February of 2011, when another hack against the intelligence contractor/security firm HBGary revealed, among many other things, a widespread conspiracy by the Justice Department, Bank of America, and other parties to attack and discredit Wikileaks and other activist groups. Since that time, many of us in the movement have dedicated our lives to investigating this state-corporate alliance against the free information movement. For this and other reasons, operations have been conducted against Booz Allen Hamilton, Unveillance, NATO, and other relevant institutions. The bulk of what we've uncovered thus far may be reviewed at a wiki maintained by my group Project PM, echelon2.org. – Pastebin via Zerohedge

If previous actions by Anonymous show anything, chances are good that personal and credit card data gathered for the most part, will remain inviolate.  However, confidential information taken that shows the paralytic nature between corporations, contractors, and the US government may end up being open season, just as it was for Wikileaks before their head officer was captured and indicted.


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